Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2009–10  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 04/06/2010   
   Page tools: Print Print Page RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product  
Contents >> Mining >> Production and trade of minerals

PRODUCTION AND TRADE OF MINERALS

Mineral commodities production

Tables 18.15 and 18.16 show the quantity and value respectively of selected minerals (including oil and gas) produced in Australia.

18.15 MINERAL COMMODITIES PRODUCED, Qantity

2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Percentage change
from 2002-03
to 2006-07

Metallic minerals

Bauxite Mt
54
56
57
61
63
16.7
Copper (metal content) '000 t
822
775
894
920
829
0.9
Gold (metal content) t
273
267
255
247
239
-12.5
Iron ore and concentrate Mt
194
205
236
246
263
35.8
Lead (metal content) '000 t
654
664
643
703
587
-10.2
Nickel (metal content) '000 t
192
182
180
184
174
-9.4
Silver (metal content) t
1 913
2 019
2 226
2 007
1 635
-14.5
Uranium oxide t
9 148
9 532
10 963
9 949
9 581
4.7
Zinc (metal content) '000 t
1 327
1 215
1 184
1 216
1 227
-7.5

Fuel minerals

Black coal (saleable) Mt
275
284
305
311
323
17.5
Brown coal Mt
67
66
67
68
66
-1.2
Crude oil ML
27 061
23 670
20 864
18 772
21 724
-19.7
Condensate ML
7 526
6 825
7 927
8 087
7 843
4.2
Natural gas Mm3
24 176
24 748
23 847
23 838
27 092
12.1
Liquefied natural gas t
7 765 874
7 787 261
11 037 572
12 543 261
14 321 230
84.4

Industrial minerals

Diamonds '000 ct
38 996
32 499
22 800
29 264
24 618
-36.9
Salt '000 t
10 438
10 635
12 186
11 467
10 857
4.0
Ilmenite t
1 133 556
905 367
859 733
743 971
1 417 895
25.1
Synthetic rutile t
597 274
592 178
na
na
na
na
Leucoxene t
38 060
51 734
70 729
77 024
52 257
37.3
Rutile t
192 629
189 229
na
na
na
na
Zircon '000 t
468
473
471
455
489
4.4
Manganese ore t
2 471 981
3 066 754
3 606 383
3 825 730
4 563 524
84.6

na not available
Source: ABS Mining Operations, Australia (8415.0).


In the period 2002-03 to 2006-07 the most significant increases in production were for manganese ore (85%), liquefied natural gas (84%) and leucoxene (37%). Iron ore and concentrate, ilmenite, saleable black coal, bauxite and natural gas increased in production by 36%, 25%, 18%, 17% and 12% respectively.

Production of gold, lead, nickel, silver, zinc, brown coal, crude oil and diamonds decreased between 2002-03 and 2006-07, with the largest falls recorded for diamonds (37%), crude oil (20%), silver (15%) and gold (13%).

The largest increases in percentage terms in the value of minerals production in the period 2002-03 to 2006-07 were for manganese ore (306%), copper (233%), nickel (232%), zinc (225%) and lead (153%). The value of salt in percentage terms fell by 10% (table 18.16).

18.16 MINERAL, OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION, Value

2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Percentage change
from 2002-03
to 2006-07
$m
$m
$m
$m
$m
%

Bauxite
782
817
862
875
847
8.3
Copper (metal content)
2 260
2 543
3 777
6 290
7 525
233.0
Gold (metal content)
5 046
4 731
4 635
5 609
6 284
24.5
Iron ore and concentrate
5 298
5 359
8 330
12 897
15 975
201.5
Lead (metal content)
502
654
830
1 015
1 271
153.2
Nickel (metal content)
2 528
3 139
3 613
3 816
8 402
232.4
Silver (metal content)
490
530
666
801
857
74.9
Uranium oxide
308
382
463
530
664
115.6
Zinc (metal content)
1 778
1 649
1 852
3 484
5 785
225.4
Black coal (saleable)(a)
12 724
11 566
17 720
26 317
24 368
91.5
Brown coal
534
531
843
851
1 016
90.3
Crude oil
7 888
6 721
8 471
10 080
11 416
44.7
Condensate
2 207
1 925
3 101
4 045
3 970
79.9
Natural gas
2 250
2 380
2 445
2 547
2 915
29.6
Liquefied natural gas
3 131
2 776
3 953
4 930
4 986
59.2
Diamonds
788
520
468
np
np
na
Salt
260
211
222
237
234
-10.0
Ilmenite
n.p.
n.p.
n.p.
np
np
np
Synthetic rutile
354
307
401
419
374
5.6
Leucoxene
16
20
22
24
20
25.0
Rutile
np
np
np
np
np
np
Zircon
np
np
np
400
np
na
Manganese ore
275
282
479
478
1 117
306.2

na not available
np not available for publication but included in totals where applicable, unless otherwise indicated
(a) Excludes production from Tasmania.
Source: ABS Mining Operations, Australia (8415.0).


As few minerals can be directly used in the form in which they are mined, most of these undergo processing and treatment before use.

Table 18.17 shows the production of the main manufactured products of mineral origin.

18.17 PRODUCTION OF PRINCIPAL MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS, By mineral origin

2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08

Metals

Non-ferrous
Alumina ’000 t
16 690
17 161
17 826
18 506
19 359
Refined aluminium ’000 t
1 877
1 890
1 912
1 954
1 964
Refined copper ’000 t
459
479
461
435
444
Lead bullion ’000 t
143
153
141
114
152
Refined lead ’000 t
247
234
234
191
203
Refined zinc ’000 t
502
464
446
496
507
Refined tin t
553
445
736
321
na

Ferrous

Raw steel(a) ’000 t
9 430
7 395
7 886
8 010
8 121

Precious

Refined gold t
397
345
380
360
364
Refined silver t
619
722
655
618
605

Petroleum

Petroleum products
Diesel automotive oil ML
12 544
12 822
10 154
11 055
12 177
Industrial and marine diesel fuel ML
84
22
31
21
3
Fuel oil(b) ML
1 105
1 092
1 048
942
979
Automotive gasoline ML
17 375
17 913
16 528
17 732
17 079

Building materials

Clay bricks (standard brick equivalent) m
1 789
1 705
1 606
1 570
1 459
Portland cement ’000 t
8 460
8 925
8 910
9 380
9 839

Chemicals

Single superphosphate ’000 t
1 446
1 594
1 309
944
1 413

na not available
(a) Includes recovery from scrap.
(b) Excludes refinery fuel.
Source: ABS Manufacturing Production, Australia (8301.055.001); Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), 'Australian Mineral Statistics', various issues and 'Australian Commodity Statistics 2008'.


Exports of minerals and petroleum

Tables 18.18 and 18.19 show the quantity and value respectively of the main mineral commodities exported from Australia. In 2007-08, black coal (including metallurgical and thermal) was the largest export earner ($24b), followed by iron ore and pellets ($20b), refined gold ($11b), crude oil and other refinery feedstock ($10b), copper ($7b), liquid natural gas (LNG) and alumina ($6b each) and aluminium ($5b).

18.18 EXPORTS OF MAJOR MINERALS, OIL AND GAS

2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08

Alumina kt
14 073
14 499
15 056
15 739
Aluminium (ingot metal) kt
1 512
1 617
1 638
1 650
Coal, black
Metallurgical Mt
125
120
132
137
Thermal Mt
106
111
112
115
Copper kt
701
790
699
733
Diamonds '000 ct
32 471
25 354
24 632
16 544
Gold, refined t
309
315
400
382
Iron and steel
Iron ore and pellets Mt
228
239
257
294
Iron and steel kt
2 338
2 428
2 648
2 131
Lead kt
782
756
635
589
Manganese ore and concentrate kt
3 128
3 215
4 667
5 105
Oil and gas
Crude oil and other refinery feedstock ML
15 731
13 026
15 965
15 975
LNG Mt
11
12
15
15
LPG ML
2 844
2 800
2 824
2 589
Salt kt
12 128
10 776
10 749
10 686
Tin t
1 529
1 556
1 867
3 079
Titanium minerals
Ilmenite concentrate kt
633
722
999
894
Rutile concentrate kt
158
169
307
399
Uranium oxide t
11 249
10 253
9 519
10 139
Zinc kt
1 427
1 328
1 321
1 507
Zircon concentrate kt
428
438
555
637

Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), 'Australian Commodity Statistics, 2008'.


18.19 EXPORTS OF MAJOR MINERALS, OIL AND GAS, Value

2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
$m
$m
$m
$m

Alumina
4 383
5 262
6 243
5 809
Aluminium (ingot metal)
3 726
4 788
5 650
4 967
Coal, black
Metallurgical
10 758
17 003
15 039
15 996
Thermal
6 336
7 206
6 758
8 364
Copper
3 082
5 653
6 526
6 728
Diamonds
683
836
726
664
Gold, refined
5 523
7 089
10 320
10 903
Iron and steel
Iron ore and pellets
8 120
12 854
15 512
20 423
Iron and steel
2 031
1 674
1 743
1 562
Lead
1 041
1 296
1 579
2 050
Manganese ore and concentrate
473
424
482
1 532
Oil and gas
Crude oil and other refinery feedstock
6 330
6 638
8 317
10 487
LNG
3 199
4 416
5 222
5 854
LPG
804
1 002
1 038
1 182
Salt
226
229
239
232
Tin
8
12
25
42
Titanium minerals
Ilmenite concentrate
63
76
113
104
Rutile concentrate
114
138
259
277
Uranium oxide
475
546
660
887
Zinc
1 466
2 540
4 298
3 352
Zircon concentrate
319
398
478
421

Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), 'Australian Commodity Statistics, 2008'.


Graph 18.20 shows the value of Australia's four largest mineral exports during the period 2000-01 to 2007-08. The value of exports of black coal, iron ore and pellets, crude oil and other refinery feedstock and refined gold all grew over this period, with iron ore and pellets recording the largest increase (317%), followed by black coal (126%) and refined gold (123%). Crude oil and other refinery feedstock increased 29% for the same period. The increases for black coal exports in 2000-01, 2004-05 and 2005-06 were due to an increase in unit values of metallurgical and thermal coal exports. The value of black coal exports fell in 2006-07 before growing again in 2007-08, while the export value of crude oil and other refinery feedstock fell to $5b in 2003-04 before growing to reach $10b in 2007-08.

18.20 EXPORTS OF SELECTED MINERALS
Graph: 18.20 EXPORTS OF SELECTED MINERALS

The major markets for Australian mineral and petroleum exports to Japan, China, the Republic of (South) Korea and India for the period 1992-93 to 2007-08 are shown in graph 18.21.

Japan was consistently the main destination for Australian minerals, receiving 25% ($28b) of total mineral exports by value in 2007-08. The main minerals by volume exported to Japan were aluminium, coal, iron ore, crude oil and other refinery feedstock and liquified petroleum gas (LPG). Of these minerals, coal was the most significant. In 2007-08, 67 megatonnes (Mt) of thermal (or steaming) coal, and 25 Mt of both high quality and other metallurgical (or coking) coal were exported to Japan (58%, 30% and 48% respectively of total Australian export volumes for these commodities). In the same year, 2,280 megalitres (ML) of crude oil and other refinery feedstock, 1,587 ML of LPG and 77,310 kilotonnes (kt) of iron ore were also exported to this country. These exports respectively accounted for 14%, 61% and 29% of Australia's total export volumes of crude oil and other refinery feedstock, LPG and iron ore. Aluminium exports to Japan contributed 36% of total Australian exports (by volume) of aluminium in 2007.

Other major export destinations in 2007-08 were China, the Republic of (South) Korea and India. Major exports to the Republic of (South) Korea included iron ore, thermal coal, lead ores and concentrates, refined lead metal and crude oil and other refinery feedstock which accounted for 11%, 16%, 60%, 20% and 23% respectively of export volume totals.

China has become a major export destination for iron ore and zinc ores and concentrates, accounting for 53% and 30% respectively of total export volumes for these commodities in 2007.

Exports to India have been generally increasing since 1992-93, with a sharp increase between 2002-03 and 2003-04 (107%). Gold exports of refined and unrefined bullion to India accounted for 39% (161 tonnes) of Australian exports of gold in 2007, while copper concentrate exports to India in 2007-08 (565,000 tonnes) were 37% of total Australian copper concentrate exports.

18.21 EXPORTS OF MINERAL COMMODITIES, By country of destination
Graph: 18.21 EXPORTS OF MINERAL COMMODITIES, By country of destination

18.22 IMPORTS OF MAJOR MINERALS AND PETROLEUM

2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08

Quantity

Diamonds '000 ct
2 168
4 098
3 430
2 964
Gold na
na
na
na
na
Iron and steel
Iron ore and pellets kt
4 648
5 026
4 722
4 401
Iron and steel kt
2 116
2 191
2 318
1 848
Petroleum
Crude oil and other refinery feedstock ML
26 054
24 416
25 345
26 222
LPG ML
540
599
748
965
Automotive gasoline ML
3 131
3 687
2 912
3 533
Aviation turbine fuel ML
983
817
1 045
1 846
Diesel fuel ML
3 944
6 122
5 439
7 470
Fuel oil ML
1 281
1 418
1 363
1 625
Lubricants ML
327
370
365
396
Other products ML
981
2 111
2 146
2 147
Phosphate rock kt
797
655
472
707
Platinum and platinum group metals kg
2 391
2 097
4 571
2 518

Value

Diamonds $m
347
403
397
444
Gold $m
2 462
4 800
5 309
7 311
Iron and steel
Iron ore and pellets $m
145
222
338
311
Iron and steel $m
2 041
2 075
2 479
2 225
Petroleum
Crude oil and other refinery feedstock $m
9 995
12 820
13 360
17 059
LPG $m
143
198
261
436
Automotive gasoline $m
1 463
2 342
1 872
2 719
Aviation turbine fuel $m
483
527
668
1 505
Diesel fuel $m
1 933
4 071
3 466
6 155
Fuel oil $m
364
569
536
831
Lubricants $m
288
418
495
477
Other products $m
448
637
1 285
1 331
Phosphate rock $m
49
42
32
80
Platinum and platinum group metals $m
59
70
186
111

na not available
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), 'Australian Commodity Statistics, 2008' and 'Australian Mineral Statistics,' various issues.


Imports of minerals and petroleum

Many imported mineral and petroleum commodities have had a certain amount of manufacturing applied to their raw forms. Table 18.22 provides details of the major commodities imported in the period 2004-05 to 2007-08. In terms of value, the largest imports for 2007-08 were for crude oil and other refinery feedstock ($17b), followed by gold ($7b). The major sources of Australian imports of crude oil and other refinery feedstock in 2007-08 were Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia, with a combined value of $14b (52% of the total import quantity for this commodity).

Graph 18.23 shows imports of selected major minerals and petroleum during the period 2001-02 to 2007-08. The value of imports of crude oil and other refinery feedstock were significantly higher than the import values of other minerals, particularly in 2006-07 and 2007-08, where the values of imports of this commodity were $13b and $17b respectively.

18.23 IMPORTS OF SELECTED MINERAL COMMODITIES
Graph: 18.23 IMPORTS OF SELECTED MINERAL COMMODITIES







Previous PageNext Page

Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window


Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.