New 2011 Census data reveals more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

30 October 2012 | CO/64

New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Education
New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Industry
New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Occupation
New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Labour force

New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Education

30 October 2012

New data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today has shown an increase in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people completing secondary school (that is, year 12 or equivalent).

Census Executive Director Andrew Henderson said the latest Census figures have shown a 1.8 percentage point increase in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people completing secondary school studies, from 11.3 per cent in 2006 to 13.1 per cent in 2011.

“In 2011, 46,072 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported completing Year 12 studies or equivalent, compared to 32,211 people in 2006, an increase of 13,861 people,” Mr Henderson said.

“There was also a marked increase in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have obtained Certificate III and IV qualifications.

“The latest figures show a 3.3 percentage point increase (9.9 per cent in 2006 to 13.2 per cent in 2011) in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have obtained a Certificate III and IV qualification. Of these 58 per cent were male.

“Similarly, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who completed a Bachelor Degree also increased from 2.9 per cent in 2006 to 3.5 per cent in 2011, an increase of 0.6 percentage point or 3,983 people.

“Of the 3.5 per cent of people who reported completing a Bachelor Degree, 67 per cent were female,” Mr Henderson said.

Management and Commerce and Society and Culture are the primary fields of study reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Mr Henderson added that the latest release of Census data will be used to inform future planning for education and other vital services in all communities across Australia.

“Census data is used to allocate government funding for all areas of Australia, and to plan vital services and infrastructure that we all use in our communities every day,” Mr Henderson said.

“Census data is available for free on the ABS website, where you can find new, easy-to-use tools that make searching Census data quick and easy."

Data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing is now available on the ABS website. Visit
www.abs.gov.au/census

New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Industry

30 October 2012

The second round of 2011 Census of Population and Housing results released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today has revealed a shift in the primary employment industry of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have reported employment in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry than ever before, with the industry now accounting for 14.6 per cent of employment, an increase of 0.2 percentage point or 3,854 people since 2006.

Of the 14.6 per cent of people who reported being employed in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry, 75.9 per cent were female.

Census Executive Director Andrew Henderson said it was interesting to see the shift from Public Administration to Health Care and Social Assistance.

“There has been a decline in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reporting employment in Australia’s Public Administration and Safety industries, making Health Care and Social Assistance the primary reported industry of employment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” Mr Henderson said.

“People who work in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry include our doctors, nurses, dentists, physiotherapists, child care workers and aged care providers.”

In 2006, Public Administration and Safety was the primary employment industry of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Figures now show it is the second most reported industry of employment, accounting for 12.7 per cent in 2011, a decrease of 4.1 percentage points from 16.8 per cent or 1,852 people since 2006.

Of the 12.7 per cent of people who reported being employed in the Public Administration and Safety industry, 52.8 per cent were male.

Education and Training (8.9 per cent), Retail Trade (8.2 per cent) and Construction (eight per cent) were the other remaining top five industries reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Males accounted for 90.5 per cent of those employed within the Construction industry.

Mr Henderson encouraged everyone to make use of Australia’s richest statistical resource.

“Census data is Australia’s richest source of statistical information and provides a comprehensive snapshot of the nation and all areas within it,” he said.

“Census data is available free online and can be used for a wide range of purposes. Our range of new, easy-to-use tools, including QuickStats, makes searching Census data quick and easy.”

Data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing is now available on the ABS website. Visit
www.abs.gov.au/census

New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Occupation

30 October 2012

New data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing has added to the picture of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander labour force.

The most commonly reported occupation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was Labourers, accounting for 17.6 per cent of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander labour force, or 25,935 people. This is down from 23.7 per cent, or 29,130 people, from 2006.

Census Executive Director Andrew Henderson said that the majority of people who reported an occupation as a labourer were male.

“Of the 17.6 per cent of people who reported working as Labourers in 2011, 68.9 per cent were male,” Mr Henderson said.

“Community and Personal Service Workers was the next most reported occupation, with 24,488 people, or 16.6 per cent, reporting an occupation in this field, up from 18,706 people in 2006 or 15.2 per cent. Of the 16.6 per cent of people who reported an occupation in this field, 69.7 per cent were female.

“Community and Personal Service Workers include health and welfare support workers, carers and aides, hospitality workers, protective service workers and sports and personal services workers,” Mr Henderson said.

Professionals (13.1 per cent), Clerical and Administrative Workers (13 per cent) and Technicians and Trade Workers (12.9 per cent) were the other remaining top five occupations reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Mr Henderson added that the latest release of Census data will be used to inform future planning for education and training and other vital services in communities across Australia.

“Census data is used to allocate government funding for all areas of Australia, and to plan vital services and infrastructure that we all use in our communities every day.

“Census data is available for free on the ABS website, where you can find new, easy-to-use tools, including QuickStats, that make searching Census data quick and easy,” Mr Henderson added.

Data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing is now available on the ABS website. Visit
www.abs.gov.au/census

New Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 2011 Census data released today: Labour force

30 October 2012

The latest figures released from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) today show Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander labour force, (people aged 15 years and over), consisted of 178,170 people at the time of the last Census on 9 August 2011.

Census Executive Director Andrew Henderson said that Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander labour force had increased in numbers since 2006.

“In line with increases in Australia’s total labour force, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander labour force has increased from 145,394 people in 2006 to 178,170 people in 2011,” Mr Henderson said.

More than 86,000 (86,714) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported being employed full-time, accounting for 48.7 per cent of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce. Of the 48.7 per cent employed full-time, 60.5 per cent were male.

Meanwhile, more than 47,000 (47,035) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported they were engaged in part-time employment, accounting for 26.4 per cent of the workforce. Of these, 63.4 per cent were female – consistent with the trend for the total population.

More than 150,000 (155,889 people or 44.4 per cent) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported they were not in the labour force. People who report they were not in the labour force can include retirees, students, and stay at home parents.

Mr Henderson encouraged everyone to make use of Australia’s richest statistical resource.

“Census data is Australia’s richest source of statistical information and provides a comprehensive snapshot of the nation and communities across the country,” he said.

“Census data is available free online and can be used for a wide range of purposes. Our range of new, easy-to-use tools, including QuickStats, makes searching Census data quick and easy.”

Data from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing is now available on the ABS website. Visit
www.abs.gov.au/census