Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
Education Services
 
 


Education Services home page > CensusAtSchool home page > Year 7 Resources

Resources

Back to Education Services home page

GeoQ 06B – Draw a population pyramid using Excel



Please note: This task is designed to be completed using a computer.
You can download this activity as a Word (.doc) file using the links at the bottom of the page.


Data:

Estimated Resident Population of Australia, age and sex, 30 June 2010.
Years
Males
% Persons
Females
% Persons
0-4
749,322
3.4
711,435
3.2
5-9
701,176
3.1
664,543
3.0
10-14
719,775
3.2
683,954
3.1
15-19
770,551
3.5
729,803
3.3
20-24
850,180
3.8
798,065
3.6
25-29
843,634
3.8
818,706
3.7
30-34
767,118
3.4
765,257
3.4
35-39
801,784
3.6
813,374
3.6
40-44
771,081
3.5
780,356
3.5
45-49
780,525
3.5
794,015
3.6
50-54
726,190
3.3
743,127
3.3
55-59
655,407
2.9
669,617
3.0
60-64
603,728
2.7
608,057
2.7
65–69
449,957
2.0
458,975
2.1
70–74
343,680
1.5
366,513
1.6
75–79
256,049
1.1
295,493
1.3
80–84
188,941
0.8
250,340
1.1
85–89
98,996
0.4
168,059
0.8
90+
39,010
0.2
92,054
0.4
Total Persons Australia 22,328,847
Source: Australian Demographic Statistics, Dec 2010. (ABS cat. no. 3101.0)


Task:

A population pyramid shows the structure of a population, that is the age and sex of the people. A population pyramid consists of two horizontal bar graphs drawn side by side, with the ‘y’ axis representing the age groups. The female population is shown on the right and the male on the left of the diagram. The pyramid may be drawn with either the number of people in each age category or the percentage of total persons for each age category. To make comparisons between pyramids use the percentage (%) value.

1. Use the table above and Excel to construct a population pyramid for Australia. Insert a horizontal bar chart for the female data. Do the same for the male data but double click the horizontal axis and select ‘Values in reverse order’, and overlap and align both charts as shown below.

Fig. 1 Frequency Table
Years
%Males
Years
%Female
0–4
3.4%
0–4
3.2%
5–9
3.1%
5–9
3.0%
10–14
3.2%
10–14
3.1%
15–19
3.5%
15–19
3.3%
20–24
3.8%
20–24
3.6%
25–29
3.8%
25–29
3.7%
30–34
3.4%
30–34
3.4%
35–39
3.6%
35–39
3.6%
40–44
3.5%
40–44
3.5%
45–49
3.5%
45–49
3.6%
50–54
3.3%
50–54
3.3%
55–59
2.9%
55–59
3.0%
60–64
2.7%
60–64
2.7%
65–69
2.0%
65–69
2.1%
70–74
1.5%
70–74
1.6%
75–79
1.1%
75–79
1.3%
80–84
0.8%
80–84
1.1%
85–89
0.4%
85–89
0.8%
90+
0.2%
90+
0.4%


Fig. 2 chart before axis is reversed


Fig. 3 Select 'Values in reverse order' from the Format Axis box



Fig. 4 Chart for males with axis reversed



Fig. 5 Finished Chart


2. Use your population pyramid to describe the structure of the Australian population. Comment on the following:

    • width of the base of the pyramid
    • width of the top of the pyramid
    • shape of the sides
    • at least one difference between the male and female populations.
Extension:

3. Create a population pyramid for your own State or Territory for the most recent population statistics. Go to the ABS Year Book Australia – make sure you have the latest publication. Select the ‘Data cube’ called ‘Population by age and sex’ and download the Excel spread sheet.

4. Explore data in the publication to find how many males over 100 years of age there are in your state or territory? Compare this with the number of females.

      State or Territory:

      Number of males over 100 years =

      Number of females over 100 years =




Download:
GeoQ_06B.docGeoQ_06B.doc
(Word 215 KB)


Commonwealth of Australia 2008

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.