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Indigenous Statistics for Schools
 



Indigenous Health HEALTH

Health Risk Factors

Diet and Exercise

A diet high in saturated fats and refined carbohydrates increases the likelihood of developing diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and renal failure. Regular exercise and intake of fibre-rich foods (such as fruit and vegetables) can have a protective effect against disease. (National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Australia, 2004–05, cat. no. 4715.0)


Fruit and Vegetables

Image: fruit and vegetablesThe National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines recommend a minimum of five serves of vegetables per day and two serves of fruit per day.

In 2004–05, the majority of Indigenous people aged 12 years and over reported eating vegetables (95%) and/or fruit (86%) daily. Fruit and vegetables may be less accessible to Indigenous people living in remote areas, of whom one in five (or 20%) reported no usual daily fruit intake compared with one in eight (12%) in non-remote areas. The disparity was even greater for vegetables, where 15% of people in remote areas did not report a usual daily intake compared with 2% in non-remote areas.


Salt

In 2004–05, around seven in ten Indigenous people either sometimes (25%) or usually (46%) added salt after cooking. Overall, Indigenous people in remote areas were more likely than those in non-remote areas to report either sometimes or usually adding salt to their meal after cooking (83% compared to 65% respectively). Almost 35% of Indigenous people living in non-remote areas said they never/rarely add salt, compared to 16% living in remote areas.


Frequency of Adding Salt to Meals , by Remoteness, Indigenous persons, 2004–05
Frequency of adding salt to meals
Remoteness Areas
Remote
(%)
Non-remote
(%) (a)
Never/Rarely
16
35
Sometimes
30
23
Usually
54
43
(a) sum of components may be more than 100% due to rounding errors.
Source: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Australia, 2004–05 (cat. no. 4715.0).



Frequency of Adding Salt to Meals, by Remoteness, Indigenous persons, 2004–05

Source: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Australia, 2004–05 (cat. no. 4715.0).



Milk

In 2004–05, over three-quarters (79%) of Indigenous people usually drank whole (full cream) milk, with 16% reporting to drink reduced fat or skim milk. Those living in remote areas (87%) were more likely to drink whole milk (including full cream powdered milk) than those living in non-remote areas (76%). Nevertheless, Indigenous people in non-remote areas were more likely to drink full cream milk than non-Indigenous people, regardless of age.


Whole Milk Consumption in Non-Remote Areas, by Indigenous status and age, 2004–05
Age group (years)
Indigenous
%
Non-Indigenous
%
12–14
88
69
15–24
81
55
25–34
76
49
35–44
73
48
45–54
68
37
55 and over
58
35
Source: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, Australia, 2004–05 (cat. no. 4715.0).



Whole Milk Consumption in Non-Remote Areas, by Indigenous status and age, 2004–05

Source: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, Australia, 2004–05 (cat. no. 4715.0).



Further Information: See National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, Australia, 2004–05 (cat. no. 4715.0).



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