4431.0.55.003 - Experiences of Violence and Personal Safety of People with Disability, 2016  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 28/11/2018  First Issue
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MEDIA RELEASE
28 November 2018
Embargoed: 11.30 am (Canberra time)

People with disability more likely to experience physical violence


People with disability or a long-term health condition were more likely to have experienced physical violence compared with people without disability or a long-term health condition, according to new figures released today from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2016-17 Personal Safety Survey.

Stephen Collett, Program Manager for Education, Crime and Culture Statistics, said: “The survey results show that 5 per cent (or 288,700) of people with disability or a long-term health condition experienced physical violence, in 2016, compared with about 4 per cent (or 531,300) of people without disability or a long-term health condition”.

"The survey also shows that the proportion of people with disability or a long-term health condition who experienced physical violence varied across different disability types.

“For example, almost one in eight people with psychological disability and intellectual disability experienced physical violence in 2016, compared with one in twenty people with physical disability," he said.

Sexual harassment

The PSS also collected information about men’s and women’s experiences of selected types of sexual harassment. The survey showed that people with disability or a long term health condition experienced sexual harassment at a higher rate than those without disability or a long-term health condition, 15 per cent compared to 13 per cent.

"This disparity was more prominent for younger Australians. “The survey found that two in five people (43 per cent or 172,400) with disability or a long-term health condition in the 18-24 age group reported experiencing sexual harassment in 2016. This was almost double the proportion of people without disability or a long-term health condition in this age group (24 per cent or 433,000 people),” Mr Collett said.


Media note:

        Physical violence is defined as the occurrence, attempt or threat of physical assault experienced.

        Sexual harassment is considered to have occurred when a person has experienced or been subjected to behaviours which made them feel uncomfortable, and were offensive due to their sexual nature. Further information can be found in Personal Safety, Australia, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0)

        A disability or long-term health condition exists if a limitation, restriction, impairment, disease or disorder has lasted, or is expected to last for six months or more, which restricts everyday activities.

        The survey measures the experiences of men and women in relation to rates of violence, sexual harassment, stalking, partner violence, and partner emotional abuse. Further information can be found in Personal Safety, Australia, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0) and Personal Safety Survey, Australia: User Guide, 2016 (cat. no. 4906.0.55.003).

        When reporting ABS data, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or ABS) must be attributed as the source.

        For media requests and interviews, contact the ABS Media Team on 1300 175 070 or media@abs.gov.au (8.30am - 5pm Monday - Friday AEDT).

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For more detailed information about the definitions used in the survey refer to the publication Glossary.