1100.2 - Statistics Victoria, Jun 2011  
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Contents >> Recent Releases >> Social and Demographic Statistics

SOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC STATISTICS

On this page:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing: A focus on children and youth, Apr 2011
Apparent Consumption of Alcohol, Australia, 2009–10
Australian Social Trends, Mar 2011
Causes of Death, Australia, 2009
Disability, Australia, 2009
Disability, Vocation and Education Training, 2009
Experimental Estimates of Preschool Education, Australia, 2010
Family Characteristics, Australia, 2009–10
Federal Defendants, Selected States and Territories, 2009–10
Migrant Data Matrices, 2008
Migration, Australia, 2009–10
Overweight and Obesity in Adults in Australia: A Snapshot, 2007–08
Perinatal Deaths, Australia, 2009
Perspectives on Sport, Jun 2011
Private Hospitals, Australia, 2009–10
Recorded Crime - Victims, Australia, 2010
Social Participation of People with a Disability, 2011
Sports and Physical Recreation: A Statistical Overview, Australia, 2011
Information Paper: Disability, Ageing and Carers, Basic CURF, Australia, 2009
Microdata: Patient Experiences in Australia, Expanded CURF, Jul 2009 to Dec 2009
Technical Manual: Patient Experiences in Australia, Expanded CURF, Jul 2009 to Dec 2009


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing: A focus on children and youth, Apr 2011 (cat. no. 4725.0) - released 29/04/2011: First Issue

Data available at the following geographic levels: National, states, Indigenous regions, non-remote and remote

This publication provides information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young.

In 2008, almost half (47%) of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth (aged 15 to 24) living in remote areas spoke an Indigenous language. This compares to 13% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth who could speak an Indigenous language, which is down from 18% in 2002.

In contrast to this decrease in Indigenous language skills, 21% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (aged 3 to 14) who did not speak an Indigenous language at home were learning one. About one in three (31%) children also spent time with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander elder at least once a week.

In 2008, one-quarter (26%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth reported having experienced discrimination in the past 12 months because of their origins.

To find out more about Indigenous culture and heritage, as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in leisure housing circumstances, and experiences of law and justice, please visit the publication.

Apparent Consumption of Alcohol, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4307.0.55.001) - released 03/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

This publication provides estimates of apparent consumption of alcohol based on the availability of alcoholic beverages in Australia. It provides estimates of the quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption from beer, wine, spirits, and Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages (RTDs), plus estimates of the total volume of beer and wine available for consumption.

There were 186.1 million litres of pure alcohol available for consumption from alcoholic beverages in Australia in 2009–10. This was 1.9% more than the amount available for consumption in 2008–09 (182.7 million litres). This increase was comprised of increases from wine (up 4.3%), spirits (up 0.7%) and beer (up 0.8%). The amount of alcohol available for consumption from RTDs decreased by 1.9%. Overall, there were 10.4 litres of pure alcohol available for consumption per person aged 15 and over in 2009–10, the same as in 2008–09. This equates to around 2.3 standard drinks per person per day.

For more information, please visit the publication.
Australian Social Trends, Jun 2011 (cat. no. 4102.0) - released 29/06/2011

Australian Social Trends is a quarterly publication which draws together a wide range of statistics, from the ABS and other official sources, to provide a picture of Australian society and how it is changing over time.

The June edition features the following articles:
  • Overemployment
  • Work and health
  • Sport and physical recreation
  • Culture and the arts
  • Online @ home
  • Children of the digital revolution

National and state indicators are also included, which show a range of statistics covering different social areas both at a national as well as state and territory level. Released in June were indicators in the areas of Population; Education and training; and Other areas of social concern.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Causes of Death, Australia, 2009 (cat. no. 3303.0) - released 03/05/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents statistics on the number of deaths for 2009 by sex, selected age groups, and cause of death classified to the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

In 2009, there were 140,760 deaths registered in Australia, 3,186 (2.2%) less than in 2008 (143,946). The standardised death rate (SDR) decreased to 5.7 deaths per 1,000 standard population in 2009, down from 6.1 in 2008.

Since 2000, the leading underlying cause of death for all Australians was Ischaemic heart diseases (angina, blocked arteries of the heart and heart attacks). In 2009, it was the underlying cause of 16.0% (22,523) of all registered deaths in Australia, accounting for 16.7% of all male and 15.3% of all female registered deaths. In Victoria, Ischaemic heart diseases also accounted for the leading underlying cause of death, with 5,681 (15.9%) registered deaths.

Across Australia, heart disease remains the leading cause of death amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, accounting for 15.3% of all Indigenous deaths.

Nationally, deaths due to Dementia and Alzheimer's disease increased by 126.5% from 3,655 in 2000 to 8,277 in 2009. The continued increase in deaths from Dementia and Alzheimer's disease has seen this cause of death overtake Trachea and lung cancers as the third leading cause of death in Australia.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Disability, Australia, 2009 (cat. no. 4446.0) - released 02/05/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

This publication contains summary disability information about three population groups:
  • people with disabilities
  • older people (those aged 60 and over)
  • people who provide assistance to older people and people with disabilities

Almost one in five (19%) Australians, approximately 4.0 million people, had a disability in 2009. The main disabling conditions reported in 2009 were back problems and arthritis (16% and 15% of all persons with a disability respectively).

Just over half (52%) of people aged 60 and over had a disability. Most of these (63%) did not need any assistance to manage health conditions or cope with everyday activities. For those who did, the most commonly reported needs were help with property maintenance, household chores and mobility.

There were 2.6 million carers in Australia who provided some assistance to others who needed help because of disability or old age.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Disability, Vocation and Education Training, 2009 (cat. no. 4438.0) - released 03/06/2011: First Issue

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

In this publication, examination is made of the educational and vocational experiences of people with disabilities in Australia. The focus is on their participation in education, patterns of learning, levels of attainment and outcomes associated with educational experience. Examination was also be made of barriers that might inhibit their ability to capitalise on educational opportunity. For people with disability, failure to participate adequately in education can lead to a chain of events that ends in disassociation and poorer social and economic outcomes for the future.

The disparity between people with and without disability aged 25 to 44 became more apparent, at each lower level of qualification. So while 81% of people 25 to 44 with specific restrictions who had degrees were employed compared to 86% of those with no disability, for those whose highest educational attainment was Year 12, 55% of people with specific restrictions were employed compared to 81% of people with no disability. People with disability whose highest attainment was lower than Year 12, only 37% were employed compared to 75% of those with no disability.

People with disability tended to leave formal education at a greater rate than people with no disability. For instance, 13% of people with specific restrictions did not complete their certificate courses, compared to 2% of those with no disability.

For further information, please visit the publication.
Experimental Estimates of Preschool Education, Australia, 2010 (cat. no. 4240.0) - released 05/04/2011: First Issue

Data available at the following geographic level: State and territory

This new publication contains experimental estimates of episodes of enrolment and attendance at preschool program, together with counts of children enrolled and attending preschool programs in the year before full-time school in 2010 across Australia.

Due to the difference in collection reference periods used in some states and territories, only those using the same reference period can be presented together. Of note, Table 34 presents preschool episode data from all government funded providers though the 2010 Confirmed Kindergarten Funding Data Collection in Victoria. The collected data covered the vast majority of preschools in Victoria, irrespective of their management type and delivery setting.

The data was collected through the National Early Childhood Education and Care Collection (ECEC). Because of various issues in the initial iteration of this new collection, the estimates in this publication are labelled 'experimental'. For more information on the NP ECE and the collection please see the National Early Childhood Education and Care Collection Manual (cat. no. 4240.0.55.001).

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Family Characteristics, Australia, 2009–10 (4442.0) - released 27/05/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents information about changing patterns of family and household composition in contemporary Australia, children's contact with their grandparents, child support arrangements for children who have a parent living elsewhere and the contact they have with that parent.

In 2009–10 nearly three-quarters (74%, or 6.2 million out of 8.4 million) of households in Australia were families such as couples, single parents and couples with children. Family households accounted for 19.2 million people, or 88% of the Australian population. The rest of the population either lived alone (9%) or group households (3%). The total proportion of lone person households hasn't changes significantly over the last 13 years. However, the number of lone women households has risen and the number of lone men households has fallen.

In Victoria, there were 2.1 million households in 2009–10 of which 74% (or 1.5 million households) were families. Family households accounted for 4.8 million people, or 88% of the Victorian population. The remaining 12% of the population either lived alone or in group households. Lone person households comprised 23% of Victorian households in 2009–10, with 0.5 million people, or 9% of the Victorian population.

To find out more about, please visit the publication.
Federal Defendants, Selected States and Territories, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4515.0) - released 28/04/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: Selected State and territory

This publication presents statistics about finalised defendants charged with federal offences, that were dealt with by the criminal jurisdiction of the Higher (Supreme and Intermediate), Magistrates' and Children's Courts of Australia, for 2009–10, for all states and territories, except Tasmania.

There were 13,000 people charged with at least one federal offence in the Magistrates' Courts; 800 in the Higher Courts; and 200 in the Children's Courts. Of the combined states and territories, New South Wales had the highest proportion of federal defendants (34%), followed by Victoria (22%) and Queensland (21%).

These 14,000 defendants represented a total of 49,009 federal offences finalised; an average of 3.5 offences per defendant. This was an increase from the 2.5 offences per defendant in 2008–09. More than a third (34%) of defendants had a principal federal offence of fraud, deception and related offences and a further 26% had a principal federal offence of offences against justice procedures, government security and government operations. There were 2,686 federal offences finalised in the Higher Courts; 45,979 in the Magistrates' Courts; and 344 in the Children's Courts.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Migrant Data Matrices, Jun 2011 (cat. no. 3415.0) - released 29/06/2011

The Migrant Data Matrices provide users with links to data on migrants from a range of ABS products. Data include a broad selection of demographic, geographic, socio-economic and survey specific items. The statistical coverage includes topics such as Population Characteristics, Labour (Employment), Family and Community, Health, Education and Training, Housing, Personal and Household Finances, Culture and Leisure and Crime and Justice. The data items included are not exhaustive but rather provide a selection of the data available from a collection. Each data cube includes a link to the main features and explanatory notes of the source product or collection.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Migration, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 3412.0) - released 16/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication brings together statistics on international migration into and out of Australia, interstate migration within Australia and information on overseas-born residents of Australia. Australia's migration is described in the context of the Government's migration program and in comparison with international migration experienced by other countries.

Almost 6 million migrants, born in about 200 countries, live in Australia and 27% of Australia's resident population were born overseas, as at June 2010. People born in the United Kingdom continued to be the largest group of overseas-born residents, accounting for 1.2 million people. The next largest group was born in New Zealand with 544,000 people, followed by China (380,000 people).

In 2009–10, net overseas migration (NOM) added 60,400 people to Victoria, accounting for 28% of Australia's NOM (216,000 people). Final data on NOM reveal that Victoria recorded the highest net gain of international students in 2008–09 (43,600 people), followed by New South Wales (40,400) and Queensland (18,300).

To find out more, including overseas migration broken down by age and sex, and country of birth estimated resident population, please visit the publication
Overweight and Obesity in Adults in Australia: A Snapshot, 2007–08 (cat. no. 4842.0.55.001) - released 27/05/2011: First Issue

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

This publication discusses overweight and obesity of people aged 18 years and over in Australia in 2007-08, examining a range of factors which may influence a person's weight and some of the health consequences associated with excess weight.

One in four (24%) Australians aged 18 and over were obese in 2007–08 rising from one in five (19%) since 1995, with men gaining weight faster than women.

Rates of obesity were related to a number of environmental and socio-economic conditions:
  • a third (33%) of Australian adults living in areas of most disadvantage were obese, almost double that of people in areas of least disadvantage (17%)
  • people who had not completed Year 12 were more likely to be obese (31%) than those who had completed this level of education (19%)
  • more adults in outer regional and remote Australia were obese (31%) than those in major cities (23%)

Of note, when 2007–08 data on overweight and obesity are combined, 61% of adult Australians were either overweight or obese. This rate was higher for men (68%) than women (55%), and higher for older people than younger people. For instance, three-quarters (75%) of people aged 65 to 74 were overweight or obese, compared with 37% of those aged 18 to 24.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Perinatal Deaths, Australia, 2009 (cat. no. 3304.0) - released 17/05/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents 2009's number of fetal, neonatal and total perinatal deaths classified to the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Diseases (ICD) by sex and cause of death.

Perinatal deaths comprise stillbirths (fetal deaths) and deaths of infants within the first 28 completed days of life (neonatal deaths). In 2009, there were 2,671 perinatal deaths registered in Australia, compared with 2,501 registered in 2008, an increase of 6.8%. This was 5.4% higher than the number registered in 2000 (2,534). In 2009, there were 636 perinatal deaths registered in Victoria, an increase of 12.2% from 2008.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Perspectives on Sport, Jun 2011 (cat. no. 4156.0.55.001) - released 27/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

Australia is a great sporting nation and there is often a high-level of interest in the community and media in participation rates and other aspects of sport and physical recreation. The National Centre for Culture and Recreation Statistics (NCCRS), through the 'Perspectives on Sport' series, aims to provide informed commentary on a range of topics relating to this area.

Articles in the latest edition include information about people's participation in non-playing roles, spectator attendance at sporting events and adults' and children's participation in tennis. A range of statistics relating to the kinds of facilities people use for physical recreation activities are also included.

In 2009–10, walking for exercise was the most popular physical recreation activity:
  • 88% of those who took part in walking for exercise used other outdoor facilities such as paths, parks, walking trails, and the beach
  • the 22% who used their own or another home for walking could possibly be using equipment, such as a treadmill for exercise
  • 29% of people who walked for exercise were doing so in a structured facility such as a fitness centre or a gym, which could imply that people use gym equipment, such as a treadmill, for walking

For more information about these and other sports and physical recreation activities, please visit the publication.
Private Hospitals, Australia, 2009–10 (cat. no. 4390.0) - released 17/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and Territory

This publication presents statistics about the operation of private acute and psychiatric hospitals, and free-standing day hospital facilities in Australia. Information is included about facilities (beds available, special units), activities (patient throughput, days of hospitalisation provided, bed occupancy rates), patients (types of admitted patients, outpatients and operations performed), staffing and finances.

There were 581 private hospitals operating in Australia in 2009–10 compared with 564 in 2008–09, the net effect of an unchanged number of Acute and psychiatric hospitals and an increase of 17 Free-standing day hospitals. In Victoria, there were 78 Acute and psychiatric hospitals and 83 Free-standing day hospital facilities operating in 2009–10.

The number of available beds and chairs increased 2.1% from 27,180 in 2008–09 to 27,748 in 2009–10. The number of beds and chairs in Acute and psychiatric hospitals increased by 1.0% while those in Free-standing day hospitals increased by 13.1%. Total patient separations were 6.7% higher overall in 2009–10 (3.6 million) compared to 2008–09 (3.4 million).

Private hospitals provided 8.4 million days of hospitalisation to patients in 2009–10, up 3.7% on 2008-09 (8.1 million). Staff numbers (full-time equivalent) increased by 8.5% to 56,600 in 2009–10 compared to 2008–09 (52,100).

For further information, please visit the publication.
Recorded Crime - Victims, Australia, 2010 (cat. no. 4510.0) - released 23/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication presents national crime statistics relating to victims of a selected range of offences that have been recorded by police. These statistics provide indicators of the level and nature of recorded crime victimisation in Australia. Users of this publication should note that not all crimes are reported to or recorded by police.

During 2010 there were 17,757 victims of sexual assault recorded by police, with 25% of these victims aged 10 to 14. The majority of all sexual assault victims were female (85%). Females (58%) were also more likely to be victims of kidnapping/abduction. Males were more likely to be victims of homicide and related offences (62%), robbery (65%) and blackmail/extortion (65%).

In Victoria in 2010 there were 94 victims of homicide. Victims of homicide knew their offender in 70% of cases, with 19% being victimised by a partner. There were 3,466 victims of sexual assault of whom 86% were female. Among victims of sexual assault, 24% were victimised by a family member.

There were 2,732 person victims of robbery in Victoria in 2010, with 77% of victims being male. Over 90% of robbery victims were victimised by either a stranger or an offender where the relationship could not be determined.

For further information, please visit the publication.
Social Participation of People with a Disability, 2011 (cat. no. 4439.0) - released 22/06/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National

This article examines different aspects of social participation of people with disabilities. The data is drawn from the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2009, the General Social Survey 2006 and the Time Use Survey 2006.

The vast majority of people with a disability had participated in social activities in their homes in the 3 months prior to interview. Of people with profound or severe disability, 94% reported having participated in at least one social activity, compared with 97% of people with less restrictive disabilities.

The majority of people with profound or severe disability felt they could confide in someone living outside their household, although they were more likely to nominate a family member they could rely on (83%) than friends (73%), compared to people with no disability, of whom 90% had nominated an ex-household family member and 90% nominated friends they could confide in.

People with profound or severe disability who are intellectually or psychologically impaired are less likely to report feeling safe at home alone at night (56% and 61% respectively), compared to 73% of people with a physical disability and 88% of people who do not have a disability.

The two venues most likely to have been frequented in the 12 months prior to interview were libraries and cinemas, although having a disability and the severity of the disability decreased the likelihood of an individual attending these places. Cinema attendance was reported by 44% of people with profound or severe disability. For people with less restrictive disability, this rose to 61% and to 75% for people without a disability.

To find out more about various social participation of people with disability, please visit the publication.
Sports and Physical Recreation: A Statistical Overview, Australia, 2011 (cat. no. 4156.0) - released 13/04/2011

Data available at the following geographic levels: National; State and territory

This publication brings together information about sport and physical recreation in Australia from a variety of Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data sources and provides a statistical of overview of sports and physical recreation in Australia. Topics covered include:
  • output of the sports and physical recreation sector
  • employment in sports and physical recreation
  • government outlays on recreation
  • international trade in sports and physical recreation goods
  • spectator attendance at sporting events
  • participation in sports and physical recreation activities

Some information from the publication was:
  • 4.5 million (26%) people aged 15 and over participated in organised sport and physical recreation during the 12 months prior to interview in 2009–10
  • There were 1.7 million children aged 5 to 14 (63%) who participated in organised sport outside of school hours during the 12 months ending April 2009
  • Sport and physical recreation organisations attracted the largest number of volunteers with 1.7 million people (11% of the population)

To find out more information, please visit the publication.
Information Paper: Disability, Ageing and Carers, Basic CURF, Australia, 2009 (cat. no. 4430.0.00.001) - released 02/05/2011

This publication provides information about the release of microdata relating to the 2009 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) conducted throughout Australia during the period April to December 2009. These microdata are available in the form of a Basic Confidentialised Unit Record File (CURF).

This paper contains details of the basic unit record file available via CD-ROM or accessed through the Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL) or the ABS Data Laboratory (ABSDL). It explains background information, data content, technical details and the conditions of use of the CURF and should be used as a reference document when interrogating the file. An Excel spreadsheet listing all the data items available on the Basic CURF, a copy of both the Household and Establishment questionnaires, and a set of Prompt Cards (related only to the Household component) accompanies this publication.

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Microdata: Patient Experiences in Australia, Expanded CURF, Jul 2009 to Dec 2009 (cat. no. 4840.0 ) - released 22/06/2011: First Issue

This Expanded Confidentialised Unit Record File (CURF) provides detailed data relating to Patient Experience that was collected in the 2009–10 Multipurpose Household Survey.

It provides data on characteristics and experiences of both people that accessed health services, and those that did not. Information was given by people aged 15 years and over for a wide range of health services, including GPs, medical specialists and hospitals. Information on children's use of health services was also collected from households with children under 15.

The CURF enables users to tabulate, manipulate and analyse data to their individual specifications. Steps to confidentialise the data, including removing any information that might uniquely identify an individual, have been taken that ensures the confidentiality of respondents while at the same time maintaining the integrity of the data and optimising its content.

The Expanded CURF is accessible through the Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL) or the ABS Data Laboratory (ABSDL).

To find out more, please visit the publication.
Technical Manual: Patient Experiences in Australia, Expanded CURF, Jul 2009 to Dec 2009 (cat. no. 4840.0.55.002) - released 22/06/2011

This Technical Manual provides information about the release of microdata relating to the Patient Experience, available in the form of an Expanded Confidentialised Unit Record File (CURF).

Microdata are the most detailed information available from a survey and are generally the answers to most individual questions or the data derived from answers to two or more questions.

An Expanded CURF provides the maximum level of detail possible when releasing unit record files, while at the same time maintaining the integrity of the data and the confidentiality of individual respondent information.

The CURF can be accessed through the Remote Access Data Laboratory (RADL) or the ABS Data Laboratory (ABSDL). For information on applying for access to ABS CURFs, see the CURF Microdata Entry Page on the ABS website.

This manual explains the data content, technical details and the conditions of use of the CURF and should be used as a reference document when interrogating the file. An Excel spreadsheet listing all the data items available on the CURF accompanies this manual.

To find out more, please visit the publication.

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