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3218.0 - Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2008-09 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/03/2010   
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WESTERN AUSTRALIA



State summary

Perth statistical division

Population change in the regions

Population density

Centre of population

Local government area populations



STATE SUMMARY

At June 2009, the estimated resident population of Western Australia (WA) was 2.25 million people. The population had increased by 68,100 since June 2008. The majority of this increase was derived from net overseas migration, followed by natural increase and net interstate migration.

WA's growth rate in 2008-09 was 3.1%. This was higher than the average annual growth rate of 2.5% for the five years to June 2009, and the fastest of all of the states and territories.

SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Western Australia - 2008-09
Diagram: SLA POPULATION CHANGE, Western Australia—2008–09


PERTH STATISTICAL DIVISION

The Perth SD experienced the state's largest population growth, increasing by 52,200 people (3.2%) in 2008-09. The Perth SD accounted for 77% of WA's growth between June 2008 and June 2009, and was home to 74% of the state's population in June 2009.

The largest population growth continued to occur in the outer suburban fringes of the Perth SD. Wanneroo (C), Stirling (C), Swan (C), Rockingham (C), Cockburn (C) and Gosnells (C) each grew by more than 3,000 people in the year to June 2009. Together, these LGAs accounted for over half of the growth in the metropolitan area. Wanneroo (C) and Stirling (C) are in the north, Swan (C) is to the east, Gosnells (C) to the south-east and Rockingham (C) and Cockburn (C) are coastal LGAs to the south of the city.

In the Perth SD, the fastest-growing LGAs in 2008-09 were Perth (C) (up by 12.8%), Serpentine-Jarrahdale (S) (7.6%) and Wanneroo (C) (7.1%).

No LGAs in the Perth SD experienced population decline in the year to June 2009.

The growth in southern suburban Melville (C) and in southern coastal Rockingham (C) took each of these centre's populations past the milestone on 100,000 people in 2008-09.

LGAs WITH LARGEST AND FASTEST POPULATION GROWTH, Western Australia

ERP at 30 June
Population Change
2009p
2008r-2009p
LGA
no.
no.
%

LARGEST GROWTH

Wanneroo (C)
144 100
9 500
7.1
Stirling (C)
198 800
5 000
2.6
Swan (C)
110 100
4 300
4.1
Rockingham (C)
100 200
3 900
4.1
Cockburn (C)
88 700
3 800
4.5

FASTEST GROWTH(a)

Perth (C)
17 100
1 900
12.8
Serpentine-Jarrahdale (S)
16 500
1 200
7.6
Wanneroo (C)
144 100
9 500
7.1
Murray (S)
14 800
900
6.5
Capel (S)
12 700
720
6.0

(a) Excludes LGAs with a population of less than 2,000 at June 2008.


POPULATION CHANGE IN THE REGIONS

At June 2009, the population of the remainder of WA was 586,100 (26% of the state's total). This population had increased by 15,900 people (2.8%) since June 2008.

All eight Statistical Divisions within the remainder of the state grew in population in the year to June 2009.

South West SD grew the most, increasing by 4.0% (9,500 people) in 2008-09. Nearly all LGAs in South West experienced growth during the year with Murray (S) growing the fastest (6.5%), and Mandurah (C) gaining the most people (3,300). Capel (S), Dardanup (S) and Busselton (S) also increased at a rate faster than the region's average.

Outside the metropolitan area, the Pilbara was the state's second fastest-growing SD, with 3.1% growth, followed by Lower Great Southern (2.2%), then Kimberley (2.1%).

Although not apparent at the broader (SD) level, almost one-third of LGAs outside the Perth metropolitan area declined or had no change in their populations during the year to 2009. Of these, over half already had populations below 1,000 people.

POPULATION DENSITY

WA's population density at June 2009 was 0.9 people per square kilometre (sq km). Most of WA had a very low population density, with over half of SLAs (comprising 97% of the total area of the state) having less than one person per sq km. The population density of the Perth SD for the same period was 310 people per sq km, lower than Australian capital cities combined (370 people per sq km).

At June 2009, the SLAs with the highest population densities within the Perth SD were Vincent (T) (2,700 people per sq km), Subiaco (C) (also 2,700) and East Fremantle (T) (2,400).

With a density of just 18.2 people per sq km, Serpentine-Jarrahdale (S) in the south-east had the lowest density of all SLAs within the Perth SD, followed by Mundaring (S) (59.5) in the east.

Between June 2008 and June 2009, the largest increases in population density within the Perth SD occurred in the SLAs of Perth (C) - Remainder (up 170 people per sq km), Perth (C) - Inner (110) and Subiaco (C) (70).

POPULATION DENSITY, Perth SD - June 2009
Diagram: POPULATION DENSITY, Perth SD—June 2009


CENTRE OF POPULATION

At June 2009, the centre of population for WA was in the Avon Valley National Park, in the LGA of Toodyay (S). In the five years to June 2009, the centre moved approximately 3.3 kilometres south-west, reflecting strong population growth in Perth.

The centre of population for the Perth SD at June 2009 was in the Swan River, between the Perth central business district and South Perth.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA POPULATIONS

For a full list of LGA populations, see the Downloads tab.

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