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8710.5 - Housing Motivations and Intentions, Western Australia, Oct 2012 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 21/05/2013   
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Image: Overview OVERVIEW


The Western Australian Housing Motivations and Intentions Survey collected information from persons aged 18 years and over on their current and future housing intentions. Information on factors that influence housing decisions such as the location and characteristics of the dwelling were also collected. This information supports housing policy, planning and development in Western Australia (WA).

In 2012, there were 1.8 million adults (persons aged 18 years and over) living in WA. This was an increase of 371,000 adults since 2005. The majority (78%) lived in the Greater Perth area (Tables 1 and 2).

Household types

An estimated 31% of Western Australian adults lived in couple family with dependent children households, 28% lived in couple only households, 13% lived in lone person households and 5% lived in one parent family with dependent children households (Table 4).

Over a quarter of all Western Australian adults (29%) lived in a senior household, that is, where at least one person was aged 60 years or more. This proportion was similar to that in 2005 (27%). People in senior households were more likely to live in a fully owned dwelling (63%) than a dwelling that was being purchased or rented (21% and 14% respectively). In Mandurah, a popular retirement location, 41% of people lived in a senior household. In contrast, in Western Australia - Outback, 20% of people lived in a senior household (Tables 1, 5 and 6).

People living in couple only families were the most likely to fully own their dwelling (43%). Nearly two thirds of people living in couple families with dependent children (61%) and just over one third of people living in one parent families with dependent children (36%) were paying off a mortgage (Table 4 and Graph 1).

Group households were most likely to live in a rented dwelling (76%). A relatively high proportion of people living in one parent families with dependent children (49%) and lone person households (36%) also lived in a rented dwelling (Table 4 and Graph 1).

Graph Image for Graph 1 - Dwelling tenure, By selected family composition of household

Annotation(s): (a) Owner without a mortgage for group household not available for graph

Source(s): Housing Motivations and Intentions, Western Australia



Length of time in current dwelling

A third of all Western Australian adults (33%) had lived in their current dwelling for ten years or more. Around 28% had lived in their current dwelling for less than two years (Table 2).

The length of time a person had lived in their current dwelling varied according to their household type. Just under half of all lone person households (46%), and 42% of people living in couple only households had lived in their current dwelling for ten years or more. Around 70% of people living in group households and 47% of multiple family households had lived in their current dwelling for less than two years (Table 4).

Dwelling types

An estimated 1.6 million Western Australian adults (85%) lived in a separate house, making separate houses the most common type of dwelling by far. This was also the case in 2005 when the same proportion of people lived in a separate house. In 2012, 8% lived in a flat, unit or apartment (Table 1).

Owners

Changes in the size of the homeowner population can reflect changes in housing affordability. Home ownership is a major focus of the State Affordable Housing Strategy 2010-2020: Opening Doors to Affordable Housing (Government of Western Australia, Department of Housing, 2010). Increasing levels of home ownership opportunities are also a goal of the WA State Government owned Keystart (Government of Western Australia, Department of Housing, 2009).

An estimated 1.3 million Western Australian adults (69%) lived in a dwelling which was owned outright or with a mortgage. Around 61% of these lived in a dwelling that was being purchased, while the rest lived in a dwelling that was owned outright (Table 2).

Of those who lived in a dwelling owned with a mortgage, 94% lived in a separate house and 3% lived in a flat, unit or apartment. Of those who lived in a dwelling that was owned outright, 91% lived in a separate house and 4% lived in a flat, unit or apartment (Table 2).

Renters

Renting is an important housing option for many Western Australians. Changes in the size and composition of the renter population are key to understanding factors involved in private and public rental housing choices and may also impact upon affordability, the supply of rental properties, and areas for future investment. Improving the availability of affordable rental housing choices is a key goal of the National Rental Affordability Scheme (Australian Government, Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2008).

An estimated 515,000 Western Australian adults (28%) rented their current dwelling. More than half of these had lived in their current dwelling for less than two years (54%) compared with 22% of mortgagees and 8% of people who owned their dwelling outright (Tables 2 and 4).

Around two-thirds of renters (67%) lived in a separate house. A further 21% of renters lived in a flat, unit or apartment (Table 2).

The majority of renters lived in a privately owned dwelling (84%). A further 10% rented from the state housing authority (Table 2).

Of the 50,000 people that rented their current dwelling from the state housing authority, 44% had lived in their current home for ten years or more, compared with only 5% of those renting from a private landlord (Table 2).

Of the 72,000 people in senior households who rented their current dwelling, 34% rented their dwelling from the state housing authority and 58% rented their dwelling from a private landlord. This compares with the 443,000 people who lived in non-senior households, that is, a household in which there were no usual residents aged 60 years or more. Of these people, 6% rented their dwelling from the state housing authority and 88% rented their dwelling from a private landlord (Table 6).


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