Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
4125.0 - Gender Indicators, Australia, Jan 2013  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 30/01/2013   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

LIFE EXPECTANCY




KEY SERIES

LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH

2000-2002
2001-2003
2002-2004
2003-2005
2004-2006
2005-2007
2006-2008
2007-2009
2008-2010
2009-2011

Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years

Males
77.4
77.8
78.1
78.5
78.7
79.0
79.2
79.3
79.5
79.7
Females
82.6
82.8
83.0
83.3
83.5
83.7
83.7
83.9
84.0
84.2

(a) Based on three years of data ending in the year shown in the table heading.

Source: ABS Deaths, Australia (cat. no. 3302.0).






RELATED SERIES


RESIDUAL LIFE EXPECTANCY AT AGE 65

2000-2002
2001-2003
2002-2004
2003-2005
2004-2006
2005-2007
2006-2008
2007-2009
2008-2010
2009-2011

Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years

Males
17.4
17.6
17.8
18.1
18.3
18.5
18.6
18.7
18.9
19.1
Females
20.8
21.0
21.1
21.4
21.5
21.6
21.6
21.8
21.8
22.0

(a) Based on three years of data ending in the year shown in the table heading.

Source: ABS Deaths, Australia (cat. no. 3302.0).



SURVIVING FROM BIRTH TO AGE 85 (a)(b)

2000-2002
2001-2003
2002-2004
2003-2005
2004-2006
2005-2007
2006-2008
2007-2009
2008-2010
2009-2011

%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

Males
34.0
35.2
36.2
37.7
38.5
39.7
40.1
40.9
41.5
42.4
Females
52.2
53.0
53.7
54.9
55.5
56.5
56.7
57.3
57.8
58.5

(a) Based on three years of data ending in the year shown in the table heading.
(b) Proportions of males and females born in the respective year expected to live to age 85.

Source: ABS data available on request, ABS Death Registrations Collection.




COMMENTARY
LIFE EXPECTANCY

Life expectancy at birth in the decade to 2011 has, on average, been higher for females than males. A baby boy born in 2009-2011 could expect to live, on average, 79.7 years, while a baby girl born in 2009-2011 could expect to live 84.2 years. However, over the decade to 2011, life expectancy at birth for males increased more quickly (up 2.3 years) than for females (up 1.6 years).

Life expectancy at birth is one of the most widely used and internationally recognised indicators of population health. It focuses on the length of life rather than on its quality, and provides a useful summary of the general health of the population. (Endnote 1)

The increases in life expectancy have been due to lower infant mortality, the promotion of healthier lifestyles, continued improvements in living standards, and ongoing medical advances leading to improvement in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. (Endnote 2)


Graph: Life expectancy at birth for males and females by age, 2000-2002 to 2009-2011



RESIDUAL LIFE EXPECTANCY AT AGE 65

There has been an increase in the average number of additional years that people at all ages can expect to live. Women aged 65 years in the period 2009-2011 could expect to live another 22 years, up from 20.8 years in 2000-2002, while men aged 65 years could expect to live another 19.1 years in 2009-2011 compared to 17.4 years in 2000-2002.

These increases in residual life expectancy at age 65 years are mainly due to improvements in aged care management, a decline in the number of deaths from chronic conditions such as heart disease, cancer and strokes (because of medical advances), and behavioural changes such as improvements in diet and lower rates of smoking. (Endnote 3)


PROBABILITY OF SURVIVAL FROM BIRTH TO AGE 85

The probability of surviving from birth to age 85 has gradually increased for both males and females over the past decade. About 42% of males born in 2009-2011 could expect to live to at least 85 years, while for females, the proportion is 16 percentage points higher at 59%. In 2000-2002, the probability of surviving to age 85 was 34% for males and 52% for females.

Life expectancy of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

While Australians can generally expect to live a relatively long life, there are differences in life expectancy between population groups within Australian society. In particular, life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is lower than it is for the non-Indigenous population.

In 2005-2007, life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males was 67.2 years, 11.5 years less than that for non-Indigenous males (78.7 years). For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females, life expectancy at birth was 9.7 years less than for non-Indigenous females (72.9 years and 82.6 years respectively). The lower life expectancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians can be attributed to a higher infant mortality rate, and a higher incidence of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, respiratory disorders, ear disease, eye disorders and some cancers, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. (Endnote 2)



Graph: Life expectancy at birth for males and females, by Indigenous status, 2005-2007

Life expectancy estimates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians for the period 2010-2012 are expected to be released in Nov 2013.


ENDNOTES

1. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), 2012, OECD Better Life Index: Health, OECD, <www.oecd.org>.
2. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2010, Measures of Australia's Progress, 2010, (cat. no. 1370.0), ABS, Canberra, <www.abs.gov.au>.
3. Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011, Australian Social Trends, Mar 2011, (cat. no. 4102.0), ABS, Canberra, <www.abs.gov.au>.

HEALTH LINKS

Glossary
Data Cubes

Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.