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8175.0 - Counts of Australian Business Operators, 2011 to 2012 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 29/10/2013   
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GLOSSARY


Business operator

For data in Section One, the business operator population comprises all owner managers of incorporated and unincorporated businesses. It excludes persons who are classified to other types of employment status categories [e.g. persons such as employees who do not own businesses (excluding owner managers of incorporated enterprises) and contributing family workers]. It also excludes persons who are under the age of fifteen and overseas visitors.

For data in Section Two, the business operator population comprises all owner managers of incorporated and unincorporated businesses. It excludes persons who are classified to other types of employment status categories [e.g. employees who do not own businesses (excluding owner managers of incorporated enterprises), contributing family workers, persons not in the labour force, and the unemployed]. It also excludes persons who are under the age of fifteen, overseas visitors and those persons who provided insufficient information on their Census of Population and Housing form to be included in the business operator population.

Business size ranges

For the purposes of this publication, business operators are classified according to the size of the main business they operate. The specific business size ranges used are based on the number of persons employed in the business. Small business operators are defined as those operators who employ fewer than 20 persons (including non-employing businesses). This treatment concords with ABS' standard (employment based) definition of "small business".

Census

The Australian Census of Population and Housing (Census) is an official count of population and dwellings, and collects details of age, sex, and other characteristics of that population.

Census statistics are used as the basis for estimating the population at the national, state and local government levels, for electoral purposes and the distribution of government funds. They are used by individuals and organisations in the public and private sectors, for planning, administration, research, and decision making.

One of the important features of the Census is that it allows different characteristics of an individual, family or household to be related. While information on some characteristics is available from other sources, only a Census can provide information on a standard basis for the country as a whole, as well as for small geographic areas and small population groups.

Childcare provision status

Childcare provision status refers to the various methods persons may organise care for a child or children. This includes instances where persons were caring for their own child/children, another person's child or children, or a combination of both.

Continuous duration with current employer or business

The length of the current period of employment people had with their employer or in their own business. The length of time includes periods of paid leave, unpaid leave or strike.

Contract work status

Refers to whether business operators worked on a contract basis or not during a reference period.

Duration with business

Duration with business is the period of time business operators have been with their businesses. The length of time includes periods of paid leave, unpaid leave or strike.

Employing status

Refers to whether business operators had employees or did not have employees during a reference period.

Expected duration with business

Expected duration with business is the expected period of time business operators expect to be with their businesses before leaving and seeking other employment, retiring, downsizing, return to study, travel, etc.

Family weekly income

The sum of the individual weekly incomes reported by all family members aged fifteen years and over.

Field of Study

Field of Study refers to the subject matter taught in a course, unit, and modules of study. It is also a hierarchical classification and comprises 12 broad fields of study, 71 narrow fields and 356 detailed fields. For more information refer to the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED) (cat. no. 1272.0).

Full-time workers in main job

Employed persons who usually worked 35 hours or more a week (in their main job) and others who, although usually worked fewer than 35 hours a week, worked 35 hours or more during the reference week.

Highest year of school completed

Refers to the highest level of primary or secondary schooling a person aged 15 years and over has completed.

Hours usually worked

The number of hours usually worked in a week.

Housing tenure type

The tenure status of a business operator’s occupancy of their residence: owned outright, owned with a mortgage or renting.

Incorporated entity

Incorporated Entities are those entities which are given corporate, or separate legal entity status under legislation such as the Corporation Act 2001 and other Parliamentary Acts.

Indigenous status

Indigenous status indicates whether or not an individual is a person of Aboriginal origin and/or Torres Strait Islander origin.

Individual weekly income

The gross weekly income (including pensions and allowances) that the person usually receives each week.

Industry (ANZSIC)

Individuals have been classified according to their description of activities undertaken by their employer/business at the place where they work. Businesses are coded to industries in the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification 2006 (ANZSIC06) which is a classification system for grouping producing businesses (of both goods and services) in Australia and New Zealand to permit comparability of data.

Within ANZSIC, there is a structure comprising four levels ranging from industry division (broadest level) to the industry class (finest level). For more information, users should refer to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification 2006 (cat. no. 1292.0).

Industry division

The main purpose of the industry division level is to provide a limited number of categories which give a broad overall picture of the economy. There are nineteen divisions within ANZSIC06 each identified by an alphabetical letter, that is, 'A' for Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing, 'B' for Mining, 'C' for Manufacturing, etc.

Industry of main job

An industry is a group of businesses or organisations that undertake similar economic activities to produce goods and services. In this publication, industry of main job refers to ANZSIC Division as classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC), 2006 (cat. no. 1292.0).

Main job

The business or job in which the most hours were usually worked.

Non-business operator

For data in Section One, non-business operators comprise employed persons not owning their own business and contributing family workers. It excludes business operators and persons who were excluded from the scope of the Monthly Labour Force Survey and/or Forms of Employment Survey. It also excludes persons who are under the age of fifteen and overseas visitors.

For data in Section Two, non-business operators comprise employees who do not own businesses and contributing family workers. It excludes business operators as well as persons who were not in the labour force or unemployed. It also excludes persons who were under the age of fifteen, overseas visitors and those persons who provided insufficient information on the Census of Population and Housing form to be included in the non-business operator population.

Non-school qualification

Non-school qualification describes the level of education of the highest completed non-school qualification (e.g. bachelor degree, diploma).

Occupation of main job

An occupation is a collection of jobs that are sufficiently similar in their title and tasks, skill level and skill specialisation which are grouped together for the purposes of classification. In this publication, occupation refers to Major Group as defined by the ANZSCO - Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, 2006 (cat. no. 1220.0).

Part-time workers in main job

Employed persons who usually worked fewer than 35 hours a week (in their main job) and who did so during the reference week.

Reference week

The week preceding the week in which the interview was conducted.

Relationship in household

The relationship of each person in a family to the family reference person or, where a person is not a part of a family, that person's relationship to the household reference person.

Unincorporated Entity

An unincorporated entity is an entity which has not become a corporation under the Corporation Act 2001. Unincorporated entities can choose to remain 'unincorporated', where by the business does not possess a separate legal identity to that of its owner, or it can choose the limited liability status of a company where the business assets are legally separate to that of the owners.

Worked on a contract basis

Owner managers of incorporated/unincorporated enterprises who were engaged by an organisation to provide a particular service or undertake a particular task at an agreed price or rate, and generally for a specified period.


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