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4610.0 - Water Account, Australia, 2013-14 Quality Declaration 
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 26/11/2015   
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26 November 2015
Embargo: 11:30 am (Canberra Time)
Australians paying more for less water

Australian water consumption was 19,000 gigalitres (or the equivalent of 38 Sydney Harbours) in 2013-14, down by 6 per cent from 2012-13, according to the latest edition of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) annual water account.

Compared to the previous year, average yearly household expenditure on water rose 12 per cent to $584 per household, while the volume of water used per household decreased slightly.

"In 2013-14 Australian households spent more than $5 billion dollars on water, paying an average of $3.08 per thousand litres. New South Wales and Victoria experienced the highest increases in household water prices, up by 27 per cent and 24 per cent respectively. South Australian householders paid the most in Australia at an average of $4.29 per thousand litres," said Mark Lound from the ABS.

"In contrast, the cost of agricultural water use was just eight cents per thousand litres, but there are often considerable differences in water quality as well as the costs of treatment and supply for kitchen tap water compared to water for irrigation."

As in previous years, the agriculture industry was the largest consumer of water in Australia. Compared to 2012-13, usage was down 8 per cent to just over 11,500 gigalitres.

"Agricultural water use represents 62 per cent of Australia's total water consumption, with most being used in irrigation. The agricultural activity that used the most water in 2013-14 was cotton growing, at 17 per cent of Australia's total water consumption." said Mr Lound.

"Water use in agriculture was most notable in New South Wales, although consumption decreased by around 20 per cent on the previous year, from over 6,000 gigalitres to just under 5,000.

"This sort of decrease reflects farm management decisions based on rainfall patterns, river levels and overall dam storage."

Water consumption in all other industries combined was just over 5,000 gigalitres, which was less than half the amount of the agriculture industry.

Further details can be found in Water Account, Australia, 2013-14 (cat. no. 4610.0) available for free download from the ABS website

Media Notes:
  • When reporting ABS data you must attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
  • Media requests and interviews - contact the ABS Communications Section on 1300 175 070.

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