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1380.0.55.013 - Perspectives on Regional Australia: Housing Arrangements - Rental Rates in Local Government Areas, 2011  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 08/04/2014  First Issue
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MEDIA RELEASE
8 April 2014
Embargo: 11.30 am (Canberra time)
46/2014

WA regions show highest rise in rent

Rent payments in Western Australia have grown more than every other state and territory in Australia, according to data released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Ms Lisa Conolly, ABS Director of Rural and Regional Statistics said Western Australia reported the biggest increase in median weekly rent, rising 77 per cent, from $170 in 2006 to $300 in 2011.

"Local Government Areas in Western Australia recorded some of the biggest growth in median rent payments in Australia, with eight out of the ten fastest growing regions located in Western Australia. However, Weipa, in far north Queensland, came in at the top, reflecting a change from employer owned housing to private rental arrangements," said Ms Conolly.

Local Government Areas in Greater Sydney continued to have the highest median rents in Australia, with the highest in Ku-ring-gai ($575 per week) and Woollahra ($550 per week).

Cottesloe ($450 per week) had the highest median rent in Western Australia, followed by Perth ($440 per week). In Victoria, Melbourne ($400 per week) and Bayside ($390 per week) were highest.

"It is important to note that the cost of renting in a region may change over time due to changes in workforce demand, population growth or decline, or changing tenure arrangements," added Ms Conolly.

"Nationally, rental costs increased by more than mortgage repayments with the median weekly household rent rising from $191 in 2006 to $285 in 2011 - an increase of 49 per cent. Whereas mortgage repayments have increased 39 per cent during this time.

"Rental costs have also increased by twice as much as wages with the median weekly household income increasing from $1,027 in 2006 to $1,234 in 2011, up 20 per cent," said Ms Conolly.

Further information can be found in Perspectives on Regional Australia: Housing Arrangements - Rental Rates in Local Government Areas, 2011 (cat. no. 1380.0.55.013), available for free download from the ABS website(www.abs.gov.au).

Media Note:
  • Unless otherwise indicated, regions in this media release refer to Local Government Areas.
  • The Census provides a snapshot of housing tenure and housing costs in Australia on Census Night.
  • The median is the value that divides a set of data exactly in half. It is the middle value when the values in a set of data are arranged in order.
  • When reporting ABS data you must attribute the Australian Bureau of Statistics (or the ABS) as the source.
  • Media requests and interviews - contact the ABS Communications Section on 1300 175 070.



FASTEST GROWTH IN MEDIAN WEEKLY RENT PAYMENTS(a), by Local Government Area(b), 2006 and 2011

Local Government AreaState/Territory
Median Rent Payment
Change

2006
($/week)
2011
($/week)
($)
(%)

WeipaQld.
36
241
205
569.4
RavensthorpeWA
109
220
111
101.8
Serpentine-JarrahdaleWA
155
309
154
99.4
PalmerstonNT
190
360
170
89.5
BassendeanWA
160
300
140
87.5
ArmadaleWA
155
290
135
87.1
BoddingtonWA
120
224
104
86.7
WannerooWA
190
350
160
84.2
BelmontWA
163
300
137
84.0
CockburnWA
180
330
150
83.3

(a) Applicable to occupied private dwellings which were rented (or occupied rent-free) by a member of the household. Excludes 'Visitor only' and 'Other non-classifiable' households.
(b) LGAs with a total occupied private dwelling count under 500 dwellings are excluded from this table.
Source: ABS Census of Population and Housing, 2006 and 2011




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