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1345.4 - SA Stats, Aug 2005  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 23/08/2005   
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ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION

The June, September, December and March editions of this publication will provide an overview of the South Australian economy. In the intervening months this publication will feature articles that provide a South Australian perspective on economic, social and environmental issues.

This month there are two articles featured.

The first article is on Average Weekly Earnings. This article describes the movement, over time of the weekly earnings for South Australians. Included are comparisons with other states and territories as well as an analysis of the changes in the average weekly earnings of South Australians over the last ten years.

The second article is on the Transition from School. This article describes the proportions of South Australian students that left school in 2003 and took on further education in 2004. It also looks at those school leavers that took on some form of employment in 2004. Included are some national comparisons on students proceeding to either further education or the labour force.

If you have any comments about this product please contact Damian Sparkes on ph: (08) 8237 7425 or alternatively e-mail damian.sparkes@abs.gov.au.


Average weekly earnings in South Australia

Full-time adult total earnings

The February 2005 trend estimate for full-time adult total earnings for South Australia was $961.70 per week. This was 7.9% lower than the national estimate of $1,044.10. In the twelve months to February 2005, the trend estimate for full-time adult total earnings for South Australia increased by 6.4%, compared with a 5.3% increase nationally.

Full-time adult total earnings for males in South Australia rose 7.3% in the twelve months to February 2005, compared with 5.4% for males in Australia. Full-time adult total earnings for females in South Australia rose just 4.3% over this period, compared with 4.9% for females in Australia.


Full-time adult ordinary time earnings

In February 2005, the trend estimate for full-time adult ordinary time earnings for South Australia was $919.50. This was 7.2% lower than the national estimate of $991.20. In the twelve months to February 2005, the trend estimate for full-time adult ordinary time earnings for South Australia increased by 5.8%, compared with a 4.8% increase nationally.

Graph: Full-time adult ordinary time earnings: Quarterly %  change in trend estimates
Source: Average Weekly Earnings, Australia (cat. no. 6302.0)


In the twelve months to February 2005, full-time adult ordinary time earnings in South Australia rose by 6.5% for males and 4.1% for females. In comparison, full-time adult ordinary time earnings in Australia rose by 4.7% for males and 5.0% for females over this period.

Graph: Full-time adult ordinary time earnings - South Australia: Quarterly % change in trend estimates
Source: Average Weekly Earnings, Australia (cat. no. 6302.0)


In February 2005, full-time adult ordinary time earnings for males in South Australia was $954.90, which was $91.80 (8.7%) less than that reported for males in Australia. South Australia ranked seventh of all states and territories for full-time adult ordinary earnings for males. The ACT ($1,233.50), Western Australia ($1,103.80), the Northern Territory ($1,079.80), New South Wales ($1,076.80) and Victoria ($1,057.40) all recorded higher full-time adult ordinary time earnings for males than the national figure of $1,046.70. Tasmania ($927.20) was the only state or territory that recorded a lower figure than South Australia.

Full-time adult ordinary time earnings for females in South Australia in February 2005 was $849.20, $40.30 (4.5%) less than that for females in Australia. In this period, South Australia ranked fifth of all states and territories for full-time adult ordinary time earnings for females. The ACT ($1,043.30), New South Wales ($932.60), the Northern Territory ($911.10) and Victoria ($902.80) all recorded higher full-time adult ordinary time earnings for females than the national figure of $889.50.

Graph: Full-time adult ordinary time earnings, Trend estimates - February 2005
Source: Average Weekly Earnings, Australia (cat. no. 6302.0)


When looking at the trend for full-time adult ordinary time earnings over a ten year period, a steady, positive movement can be seen. In the ten year period from February 1995 to February 2005 the trend estimate for full-time adult ordinary time earnings in South Australia rose by 50.5% (from $611.10 in February 1995 to $919.50 in February 2005). Nationally, over the same period, the trend estimate for full-time adult ordinary time earnings increased by 55.4% (from $637.90 at February 1995 to $991.20 in February 2005).

Graph: Full-time adult ordinary time earnings, Trend estimates
Source: Average Weekly Earnings, Australia (cat. no. 6302.0)


In comparison, the all groups Consumer Price Index rose by 28.1% for Adelaide between the March quarter 1995 to the March quarter 2005. In the same period, the weighted average of the eight capital cities also rose by 28.6%, indicating that full-time adult earnings have been staying ahead of price increases in goods and services.


Notes on the data: Weekly ordinary time earnings refers to one week's gross earnings of employees for the reference period for award, standard or agreed hours of work. Overtime payments, retrospective pay, pay in advance, leave loadings, severance, termination and redundancy payments are excluded from this measure of earnings. Weekly total earnings is equal to weekly ordinary time earnings plus weekly overtime earnings.



Transition from school

Further study

In 2003 there were 21,600 South Australian students, aged 15 to 19 years, that finished school. Of those, 41% (8,900) went on to further study in 2004. Nationally, 55% of all students (aged 15 to 19 years) who left school in 2003 went on to further study.

The level of schooling completed appears to have a strong influence on the likelihood of school leavers undertaking further study in the year after leaving school.

In South Australia there were 12,700 15 to 19 year olds that left school after completing year 12 in 2003, and 56% of these went on to further study in 2004. Of the school leavers who completed Year 11 or below in 2003, an estimated 20% (1,800) were enrolled in further study in 2004.

Nationally, 64% of 15 to 19 year olds that left school after completing Year 12 in 2003 went on to further study in 2004. However, only 34% of those school leavers who completed Year 11 or below in 2003 were enrolled in further study in 2004.

Graph: 2003 School leavers enrolled in further study, by year completed
Source: Education and Work, Australia (cat. no. 6227.0)


The level of schooling completed can also be seen to have some effect on the level of further study in which these school leavers were enrolled in 2004. For example, students need to have completed year 12 to be able to enrol in a Bachelor degree course.

In South Australia, of those 15 to 19 year olds that left school in 2003, 21% (4,500) were enrolled in Bachelor degrees. The proportion of 15 to 19 year olds that left school in 2003 and enrolled in Advanced diploma (or below) courses was also 21%.

For those students, aged 15 to 19 years that left school after completing year 12, there were a further 2,700 (21%) that went on to enrol in Advanced diploma (or below) courses. Another 5,600 (44%) of 15 to 19 year olds who completed year 12 did not go on to any further study.

In comparison, there were 1,800 (20%) students, aged 15 to 19 years, that left school after completing year 11 who enrolled in Advanced diploma (or below) courses. A further 7,000 (80%) took no further part in study.

Graph: Status of enrolment in further study, All 2003 school leavers - 2004
Source: Education and Work, Australia (cat. no. 6227.0)


Nationally, 26% of 2003 school leavers (aged 15 to 19 years) were enrolled in Bachelor degrees. In comparison, national enrolment at the advanced diploma level or below was 29% for all school leavers and 27.6% for Year 12 school leavers.


Joined the labour force

Of the 8,900 South Australian 15 to 19 year old school leavers who went on to further study in 2004, 69% (6,100) participated in the labour force. In fact, more than half of those who went on to study in 2004 combined their study with employment, with 54% (4,800) employed in either a full-time or part-time capacity.

There were 12,600 school leavers aged 15 to 19 years in South Australia who did not go on to further study in 2004. This number represented 58% of all school leavers in South Australia. Of those, 79% (9,900) were in the labour force. Employment was the main activity undertaken by those who did not continue studying, with 63% (7,900) of those not enrolled in further education being engaged in either full-time or part-time employment in 2004.

Graph: Labour force status by enrolment status, South Australia - 2004
Source: Education and Work, Australia (cat. no. 6227.0)


Nationally, regardless of their transition to further study, the employment status of all 2003 school leavers in 2004 saw 75% (16,100) participating in the labour force. Of this total 59% (12,700) were employed in either a full-time or part-time capacity.


Notes on data: A breakdown of figures is not available for either full-time and part-time employment or full-time or part-time study amongst students at the South Australian level due to the unreliability of the estimates. For Australian figures on part and full-time study/employment participation, please refer to the ABS publication - Education and Work, Australia (cat. no. 6227.0).

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