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4307.0.55.001 - Apparent Consumption of Alcohol, Australia, 2008-09  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 27/05/2010   
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About The Publication
Summary
Beer
Wine
Spirits and Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages

About The Publication

This publication provides estimates of the apparent consumption of alcohol based on the availability of alcoholic beverages in Australia. It provides estimates of the quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption from beer, wine, spirits, and ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages, plus estimates of the total volume of beer and wine available for consumption.

The publication also provides estimates of apparent per capita consumption, the total apparent consumption for the total population aged 15 years and over. The population of 15 years and over is consistent with methodology used internationally for measuring trends in apparent consumption over time.

Estimates of apparent consumption are derived using information related to supply. In the case of beer, supply is derived by combining excise data on beer produced for domestic consumption from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), data on imports from the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS), and an estimated component for home production. For wine, supply is derived using data on domestic sales collected directly from winemakers, quantity measures of import data, and an allowance for home production. As a result, data are an approximate estimate of the amount of beer and wine available for consumption, and of the amount of alcohol available as beer and wine.

For spirits (including ready to drink spirits), supply is only available in terms of the quantity of pure alcohol. This is obtained by combining excise data on domestic production of spirits from the ATO, with data on importation of spirits from the ACBPS. To avoid double counting, alcohol which is imported as material for the purposes of domestic production of spirits is excluded from the importation data.

No adjustment is made for change in stocks, and all alcohol available for consumption in a particular year is assumed to have been consumed in that year. It should be noted that the data only provides a measure of what alcohol is available for consumption in a given financial year and is not data collected from an actual consumption survey. As such, the data is most useful as a guide to trends and does not take into account alcohol that has been stored or cellared, used in the preparation of food or discarded as waste.

The 2008–09 financial year is the first year of data available following the changes to excise charges on ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages from April 2008.

Changes in this Publication

The 2008–09 publication differs from previous publications with the aim of improving the appearance and functionality of data and information that is being provided. Please refer to paragraph 2 of the Explanatory Notes for more details.

An investigation into the estimated proportion of beer produced at home was conducted. After consultation with industry a slight adjustment of a 0.1 increase was made to 2.2%. For further information please refer to paragraph 15 of the Explanatory Notes.

A review was also undertaken on the estimated alcohol content of wine, resulting in an overall increase of 1.9% for the assumed alcohol content of table wine. Please refer to paragraph 16 of the Explanatory Notes for more details.
Summary
The total quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption in alcoholic beverages between 2007–08 and 2008–09 decreased marginally by 0.14%, from approximately 178.6 million to 178.4 million litres of alcohol. This is a reversal of the trend measured in the previous four years where there has been a steady overall increase in the quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption.

The major contributor to the change in total quantity of pure alcohol apparently available for consumption was a 30.2% decrease in ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages. The overall decrease in pure alcohol apparently consumed occurred despite the increased apparent consumption of pure alcohol in the form of beer (1.7%), wine (2.2%) and spirits (13.4%).

The apparent per capita consumption of pure alcohol by persons aged 15 years and over decreased from 10.32 litres per person in 2007–08 to 10.08 litres per person in 2008–09, by 2.3% (Table 1). Again this is largely due to a fall in the apparent consumption of alcohol of ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages which more than accounts for the increases in beer, wine and spirits.


Table 1 Apparent per capita consumption of Pure Alcohol - Years ended 30 June
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of pure alcohol)
Beer
r76 890
r78 099
79 425
Wine
r61 898
r61 647
63 006
Spirits
19 355
20 160
22 865
Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages
18 123
18 693
13 056
Total
r176 266
r178 599
178 351
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/person)(a)(b)
Beer
r4.54
r4.51
4.49
Wine
r3.65
r3.56
3.56
Spirits
r1.14
r1.17
1.29
Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages
r1.07
r1.08
0.74
Total
r10.40
r10.32
10.08
Apparent per capita daily consumption (millilitres/person)(b)
Beer
12.4
12.4
12.3
Wine
10.0
9.8
9.8
Spirits
3.1
3.2
3.5
Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages
2.9
3.0
2.0
Total
28.5
28.3
27.6


(a) Table contains revised data due to new estimated residential population and changes to methodology (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 15, 16, 25 and 26)
(b) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated resident population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised


Of the total litres of pure alcohol apparently available for consumption per capita in 2008–09, beer contributed 44.5%, wine 35.3%, spirits 12.8% and ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages 7.3% (Graph 1).



(a) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated resident population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(b) Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages

As a standard drink is equivalent to 12.5 mls of pure alcohol, in 2008-09 each person aged 15 years and over had, on average, a little more than two standard drinks per day available for consumption. One of these drinks would have been in the form of beer.
Beer
The estimated quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption from beer increased by 1.7% from 78.1 million litres in 2007–08 to 79.4 million litres of alcohol in 2008–09. Apparent per capita consumption of pure alcohol available for consumption from beer, for persons aged 15 years and over, decreased marginally from 4.51 litres of alcohol per person in 2007–08 to 4.49 litres of alcohol per person in 2008–09 (Table 2).


Table 2 BEER(a)(b), Pure Alcohol available for consumption - Years ended 30 June
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of pure alcohol)
Low strength (>1.15 and =<3.0)
5 395
4 847
4 253
Mid strength (>3.0 and =<3.5)
9 336
9 535
9 865
Full strength (>3.5)
r62 159
r63 717
65 308
Total Beer
r76 890
r78 099
79 425
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/person)(c)
Low strength (>1.15 and =<3.0)
r0.32
r0.28
0.24
Mid strength (>3.0 and =<3.5)
r0.55
r0.55
0.56
Full strength (>3.5)
r3.67
r3.68
3.69
Total Beer
r4.54
r4.51
4.49


(a) Low, mid and full strength beer are graded based on percentage of alcohol contained as part of total volume (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 14).
(b) Beer estimates for 2006–07 and 2007–08 have been revised due to an update of the component of the estimated proportion of home produced beer (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 15) and changes in the estimated residential population (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(c) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised

The volume of beer available for consumption increased slightly by 1.4% from 1,828.1 million litres in 2007–08 to 1,853.0 million litres in 2008–09. Full strength beer accounted for most of the increase in total beer volume, by 2.7% or 36.8 million litres, followed by mid strength beer, which increased by 3.7% or 10.0 million litres. However, low strength beer decreased by 12.2% or 22.0 million litres in 2008–09. For the year 2008–09, the apparent per capita consumption of beer decreased by 1.0 litre of beer per person (Table 3).


Table 3 BEER (a)(b), Volume available for consumption - Years ended 30 June
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of beer)
Low strength (>1.15 and =<3.0)
200 596
180 551
158 597
Mid strength (>3.0 and =<3.5)
268 017
273 728
283 777
Full strength (>3.5)
r1 333 782
r1 373 861
1 410 614
Total Beer
r1 802 395
r1 828 140
1 852 988
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/person)(c)
Low strength (>1.15 and =<3.0)
r11.8
r10.4
9.0
Mid strength (>3.0 and =<3.5)
r15.8
r15.8
16.0
Full strength (>3.5)
r78.7
r79.4
79.7
Total Beer
r106.3
r105.7
104.7


(a) Low, mid and full strength beer are graded based on percentage of alcohol contained as part of total volume (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 14).
(b) Beer estimates for 2006–07 and 2007–08 have been revised due to an update of the component of the estimated proportion of home produced beer (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 15) and changes in the estimated residential population (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(c) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised
Wine
There was an increase in the quantity of pure alcohol available for consumption from wine between 2007–08 and 2008–09 of 2.2%, from 61.6 million litres to 63.0 million litres of alcohol. In 2008-09, apparent per capita consumption of pure alcohol available for consumption from wine for persons aged 15 years and over remained constant at 3.56 litres of alcohol per person (Table 4).


Table 4 WINE(a), Pure Alcohol available for consumption - Years ended 30 June
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of pure alcohol)
White table wine
29 250
29 304
30 182
Red table wine
22 809
22 513
22 795
Other wines
9 839
9 830
10 028
Total Wine
r61 898
r61 647
63 006
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/person)(b)
White table wine
1.73
1.69
1.71
Red table wine
1.35
1.30
1.29
Other wines
0.58
0.57
0.57
Total Wine
r3.65
r3.56
3.56


(a) Wine estimates for 2006–07 and 2007–08 have been changed due to a revision of the estimated assumed alcohol content of some wines (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 16) and changes in the estimated residential population (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(b) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised

The volume of wine available for consumption increased by 2.3% from 484.3 million litres in 2007–08 to 495.7 million litres in 2008–09. White wine, which increased by 3.0% or 7.2 million litres, accounted for most of the increase of total wine volume, followed by red wine, which increased by 1.3% or 2.1 million litres, and other wine, which increased by 2.7% or 2.0 million litres. The apparent per capita consumption of wine by persons aged 15 years and over remained constant at 28.0 litres of wine over this period (Table 5).


Table 5 WINE(a), Volume available for consumption - Years ended 30 June
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of wine)
White table wine
239 754
240 197
247 392
Red table wine
170 214
168 005
170 115
Other wines
76 257
76 124
78 171
Total Wine
486 225
484 327
495 679
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/person)(b)
White table wine
14.1
13.9
14.0
Red table wine
10.0
9.7
9.6
Other wines
4.5
4.4
4.4
Total Wine
r28.7
r28.0
28.0


(a) Wine estimates for 2006–07 and 2007–08 have been changed due to a revision of the estimated assumed alcohol content of some wines (see Explanatory Notes, paragraph 16) and changes in the estimated residential population (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(b) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised

Spirits and Ready to Drink (pre-mixed) beverages
The quantity of alcohol available for consumption in the form of spirits (excluding ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages) increased by 13.4%, from 20.2 to 22.9 million litres of alcohol between 2007–2008 and 2008–09. The apparent per capita consumption of alcohol in the form of spirits (excluding ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages) by persons aged 15 years and over increased by 10.3% (Table 6 ).

The quantity of alcohol available for consumption in the form of ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages decreased by 30.2% between 2007–2008 and 2008–09, dropping from approximately 18.7 million to approximately 13.1 million litres of alcohol. These results are a reversal of the trend from 2004–05 (when data became available) of increasing consumption of ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages. Compared with 2007–08, apparent per capita consumption of alcohol in the form of ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages for persons aged 15 years and over decreased by 31.5%, or 0.34 litres of alcohol per person in 2008–09 (Table 6).

Table 6 SPIRITS(a) and READY TO DRINK (pre–mixed) BEVERAGES(b), Pure alcohol available for consumption – Years ended 30 June(c)
2007
2008
2009
('000 litres of pure alcohol)
Spirits
19 355
r20 160
22 865
Ready to Drink (pre-mixed beverages)
18 123
18 693
13 056
Apparent per capita consumption (litres/persons)(d)(e)
Spirits
r1.14
r1.17
1.29
Ready to Drink (pre-mixed beverages
r1.07
r1.08
0.74

(a) Excludes ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages.
(b) Ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages include spirit based, wine based and other unspecified products.
(c) Volume information is not available for spirits and ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages.
(d) Table contains revised data due to new estimated residential population (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26)
(e) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
r revised




(a) Per capita estimates are based on the estimated population aged 15 years and over (see Explanatory Notes, paragraphs 25 and 26).
(b) Comparable data only available from 2004–05
(c) Ready to drink (pre-mixed) beverages




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