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1362.3 - Regional Statistics, Queensland, 2003  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 09/12/2003   
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INTRODUCTION

Regional Statistics, Queensland 2003 is a compilation of selected statistics that demonstrates Queensland’s regional diversity through statistical analysis, tables and graphs. It brings together selected economic, social and environmental statistics from both the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and non-ABS sources to highlight aspects of life in Queensland.


PEOPLE AND POPULATION

Estimated Resident Population

The estimated resident population (ERP) of Queensland at 30 June 2002 was 3,707,175. All states and territories experienced population growth in 2001-02 with the largest increases occurring in Queensland (78,229 persons), Victoria (67,812 persons) and New South Wales (65,138 persons).

Annual population growth for Queensland over the six years 1996 to 2002 averaged 1.8%, exceeding the growth rate of all other states and territories.

AVERAGE ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH RATE, Statistical Divisions - 1996-2002
Graph - AVERAGE ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH RATE, Statistical Divisions - 1996-2002
Source: ABS data available on request, Regional Population Growth,
Australia and New Zealand (cat. no. 3218.0).


Births

There were 47,495 births registered in Queensland during the year ended June 2002. Rural and urban Queensland have quite different birth and fertility characteristics. In 2001-02, most births occurred in the urban and coastal areas, with 46.6% of births registered in Brisbane Statistical Division (SD) and 17.4% in Moreton SD.

Over the five years to June 2002, the annual number of births in Queensland increased by 439 persons (0.9%). This outcome results from two distinct trends. Births in the Brisbane and Moreton SDs increased by 5.2% and 6.7% respectively in this period. In contrast, the annual number of births declined in all other regions of Queensland. This was noticeable particularly in the South West SD with a decrease of 13.1%, Central West SD decreasing by 22.3% and North West SD decreasing by 12.6%.

Deaths

In 2001-02, there were 23,174 deaths in Queensland. The majority of deaths were recorded in the south east corner of Queensland with 42.5% of deaths registered in the Brisbane SD and 20.9% in the Moreton SD. In comparison, the estimated resident population of the Brisbane and Moreton divisions were 45.6% and 20.2% respectively.

Between 1997-98 and 2001-02, the annual number of deaths in Queensland increased by 685 persons (3.0%). In this period, deaths increased in the Moreton (7.3%), Wide Bay-Burnett (7.7%), Darling Downs (9.2%), South West (10.2%), Mackay (17.2%) and Far North (12.5%) SDs. In 2001-02, the number of deaths in the North West SD was the same level as in 1997-98. The annual number of deaths decreased in all other areas between 30 June 1998 and 30 June 2002, with the largest declines in Fitzroy (8.0%) and Central West (7.8%) SDs.

Non-School Qualifications by Level of Education

On census night, 7 August 2001, there were 2,823,097 persons aged 15 years and over counted in Queensland. Of these, 32.3% reported non-school qualifications. The 451,527 persons (16.0%) with certificate qualifications from a College of Technical and Further Education (TAFE) represents the largest group holding non-school qualifications in Queensland, followed by 235,113 persons (8.3%) with a bachelor degree and 156,001 persons (5.5%) with either an advanced diploma or diploma.

PERSONS(a) WITH SELECTED NON-SCHOOL QUALIFICATIONS, Statistical Divisions - 2001
Graph - PERSONS(a) WITH SELECTED NON-SCHOOL QUALIFICATIONS, Statistical Divisions - 2001
Source: ABS data available on request, 2001 Census of Population and Housing.


Occupation of Employed Persons

At 7 August 2001, the total number of employed persons in Queensland was 1,568,865, which represented an increase of 10.4% when compared with 1996. The most significant occupation group was Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers with 265,751 persons, representing 16.9% of total employment in the state. This group was followed by Professionals (251,273), Tradespersons and Related Workers (200,665) and Associate Professionals (187,910), respectively accounting for 16.0%, 12.8% and 12.0% of persons in employment.

PERCENTAGE OF PERSONS IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS, Statistical Divisions - 2001
Graph - PERCENTAGE OF PERSONS IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS, Statistical Divisions - 2001
Source: ABS data available on request, 2001 Census of Population and Housing.

Indigenous Community Councils

From 1 July 2002, 15 Aboriginal and 17 Torres Strait Island council areas in Queensland were included in their own right as part of the LGA structure in the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC). Established under various Acts of Parliament, these Indigenous community council areas are equivalent to LGAs.

Previously, the communities’ statistics had been included with those for neighbouring shire or town councils. The separation of the Indigenous community councils from other LGAs recognises their autonomy from the shire councils and responds to the need for data, especially population data, for these areas.

The majority of the Indigenous community council areas (28) are found in Far North SD. The SDs of Wide Bay-Burnett, Fitzroy, Northern and North West have one council each.

At 30 June 2002, the estimated resident populations of the Indigenous community councils varied considerably with populations ranging from greater than 2,000 persons to less than 100. Palm Island (AC) had 2,376 persons and Yarrabah (AC) 2,320. Ugar (IC) had 57 persons and was one of only two Indigenous community councils recording a decrease in population from 2001.

Health and Public Hospitals

There were 175 public acute hospitals at 30 June 2002 in Queensland. Since 1998, the total number of hospitals has been reduced from 182, representing a decrease of 3.8%.

PUBLIC ACUTE HOSPITALS(a), Statistical Divisions - 2001-02
Graph - PUBLIC ACUTE HOSPITALS(a), Statistical Divisions - 2001-02
Source: Queensland Health: Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection, Monthly Activity Collection.


Crime

In the 2001-02 financial year, there were 434,696 incidents of crime reported in Queensland. This was a decrease of 2,158 incidents (0.5%) from the 1999-2000 figures. Property crime was the largest component with 291,495 incidents, representing 67.1% of all crime in Queensland in 2001-02. Other crime and crime against the person, respectively comprised 25.5% and 7.4% of the Queensland total.


REPORTED OFFENCES, Selected Police Districts - 2000-01 to 2001-02
Graph - REPORTED OFFENCES, Selected Police Districts - 2000-01 to 2001-02
Source: Queensland Police.


ENVIRONMENT - SALINITY ON AUSTRALIAN FARMS

Salinity describes the salt content of soil or water. Soluble salts are often found in water and soil, but not in sufficient concentrations to affect plant and animal survival. When salt content is excessive it degrades water quality and land productivity. Salinity increases are usually caused by a rise in the level of underground water tables bringing naturally occurring salt to the surface. This concentrates salt and affects the environment dependent on the soil and water.

The Commonwealth and state and territory governments have adopted the National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality (NAP). The NAP has identified 21 high priority regions in Australia, with four regions either wholly or partly within Queensland. These regions are Border Rivers, Condamine-Balonne-Maranoa, Burdekin-Fitzroy and Lockyer-Burnett-Mary. Border Rivers and Condamine-Balonne-Maranoa are partially in New South Wales. NAP regions do not include the more arid western and remote tropical far north sections of Queensland.

In May 2002, 993 Queensland farms with 107,000 hectares (ha) of agricultural land were reported by farmers as showing signs of salinity. This represented about 3.4% of total farms, being 0.1% of total farm area in the state. Of the agricultural land showing signs of salinity, 40,000 ha were unable to be used for agricultural production.

Within the four NAP regions either wholly or partly within Queensland, there were 720 farms with 67,000 ha showing signs of salinity. Non-irrigated farms accounted for 64,000 ha or 95.5% of the land showing signs of salinity in Queensland based NAP regions.

The most common salinity management practices employed were planting crops, pastures, fodder plants and trees and constructing earthworks and fencing.

In May 2002, farmers reported that 331,000 ha of crops, pastures and fodder plants were planted for salinity management purposes in Queensland. The six types of plantings included salt tolerant crops, pastures with lucerne, other deep rooted perennials, salt tolerant pasture, saltbush, bluebush and other fodder plants.


ECONOMY AND INDUSTRY

Labour Force by Statistical Regions

The annual average number of persons employed in Queensland rose from 1,702,400 persons in 2001 to 1,753,300 in 2002, representing an increase of 50,900 persons (3.0%). The growth rate in employed persons is higher than the 1.9% growth in the annual average number of persons in the Labour Force.

In the same period, the average number of persons unemployed declined by 15,700 to 140,000 persons. This equated to a decrease in the unemployment rate from 8.4% to 7.4%. The annual average participation rate remained unchanged at 65.0%.

LABOUR FORCE STATUS(a), Major Regions - 2002
Graph - LABOUR FORCE STATUS(a), Major Regions - 2002
Source: ABS data available on request, Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0).


Single Location Businesses

In Queensland, there were 396,444 single location business entities registered with the Australian Business Register (ABR) at June 2001. Property and Business Services was the largest industry sector with 82,465 entities, representing 20.8% of the state total. The Construction industry included 67,244 units or 17.0% of all Queensland businesses with one location. The third largest industry sector was Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing with 51,285 entities, accounting for 12.9% of the Queensland total.

PERCENTAGE OF SINGLE LOCATION BUSINESSES, Statistical Divisions - 30 June 2001Graph - PERCENTAGE OF SINGLE LOCATION BUSINESSES, Statistical Divisions - 30 June 2001
Source: ABS data available on request.


Building Approvals

From July 2001 to June 2002 in Queensland, there were 35,591 approvals for building with 98.4% of the total applications from private sector entities and 99.3% being for new residential dwellings. The value of total building in the state for the same period was $8,009.8m. The total included new residential dwellings of $5,018.4m and alterations and additions of $1,614.2m, which accounted for 62.7% and 20.2% respectively of the value of total building in Queensland.

VALUE OF TOTAL BUILDING APPROVED, Statistical Divisions - 2001-02
Graph - VALUE OF TOTAL BUILDING APPROVED, Statistical Divisions - 2001-02
Source: ABS data available on request: Building Approvals, Queensland (cat. no. 8731.3)


Information and Communication Technology

At the end of the September quarter 2002, there were 150 Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Queensland, a decline of 6.8% from September 2001.

There was also a decline in the number of Internet subscribers. At the end of the September quarter 2002, there were 822,000 Internet subscribers in Queensland, accounting for 18.0% of the Australian total of 4,555,000 subscribers. This was a decrease from the previous year's total of 829,000, which was 19.3% of the Australian total.

INTERNET SUBSCRIBERS, Statistical Divisions - September 2002
Graph - INTERNET SUBSCRIBERS, Statistical Divisions - September 2002
Source: Internet Activity, Australia (cat. no. 8153.0)


Tourist Accommodation

Tourism is an important part of the Queensland economy with takings from accommodation of $1,424m in 2002. This was an increase of 5.9% when compared with 2001. Takings were highest in the Gold Coast, Tropical North Queensland and Brisbane tourism regions contributing 24.0%, 20.2% and 17.6% respectively of the state total. This contrasted with the smaller tourism regions of Bundaberg, Outback and Hervey Bay/Maryborough, which together accounted for 3.8%.


TAKINGS FROM ACCOMMODATION,Tourism Regions - 2002
Graph - TAKINGS FROM ACCOMMODATION,Tourism Regions - 2002
Source: ABS data available on request, Tourist Accommodation, Australia (cat. no. 8635.0)


STATE SUPPLEMENTARY SURVEY

Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities

The October 2002 State Supplementary Survey, Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities, Queensland, presented information on the labour force experience of those who currently have or have had caring responsibilities. Survey results included the use of leave and flexible working arrangements. The survey also looked at whether caring responsibilities have an impact on labour force participation.

In the six months to October 2002, an estimated 1,068,300 persons or 47.1% of persons aged 18 years and over in Queensland provided unpaid care for another adult or child. More than half of all females provided care (52.8%), while 41.4% of males provided care. Of the total care provided, the majority (68.6%) was on a continual basis. Occasional care was provided in just over one-quarter of cases (26.3%) and once only care was provided in just 5.1% of cases.


PERCENTAGE OF EMPLOYEE CARERS TO ALL CARERS, Statistical Regions - 2002
Graph - PERCENTAGE OF EMPLOYEE CARERS TO ALL CARERS, Statistical Regions — 2002
Source: ABS data available on request, Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid
Caring Responsibilities, Queensland (cat. no. 4903.3).


FURTHER INFORMATION

In compiling Regional Statistics, Queensland 2003, the ABS has used data from a variety of its collections. Non-ABS data have been provided by Commonwealth and state government departments and agencies as well as the private sector.

The ABS has taken every care in compiling the non-ABS data into statistical divisions (SDs), local government areas (LGAs) and statistical districts (S Dists) as designated in the Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC). Any questions regarding the non-ABS data should be addressed to the department or agency of origin.

Information in Regional Statistics, Queensland 2003 is divided into two main parts: four chapters provide analysis of social, economic and environmental statistics at the regional level and three chapters contain tables with data for the state and its SDs, LGAs and S Dists. The content of each chapter is shown as follows:
  • Chapter 1 presents population characteristics of the state. The focus is at SD level and the topics include population growth, births, deaths, Indigenous community councils, selected population census data, health and public hospitals and crime.
  • Chapter 2 discusses the environmental issue of salinity on farms in Queensland, including causes and management practices.
  • Chapter 3 covers the topics of employment, single location businesses, building and construction, information and communication technology, tourist accommodation and transport.
  • Chapter 4 reports the results of the most recent state supplementary survey, Managing Paid Employment and Unpaid Caring Responsibilities.
  • Tables of data in Chapters 5, 6 and 7 provide a comparison of a range of topics across the statistical areas for the state, the 11 SDs, the 157 LGAs and 10 S Dists. New data items contained in this issue include local government finances, housing property sales and values, single location businesses and family tax benefits. Each set of tables is preceded by maps showing the boundaries of the SDs and LGAs. Accompanying text provides a regional summary.

Wherever possible, data are for 2002 or the latest available if 2002 data are not available. When analysing the data, care needs to be taken as time periods, definitions, methodologies, scope and coverage may differ between collections.


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