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6524.0.55.002 - Estimates of Personal Income for Small Areas, Time Series, 2003-04 to 2008-09 Quality Declaration 
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MAIN FEATURES

Introduction
Income change in Australia, 2003-04 to 2008-09
Regional Variations in Average Income, 2008-09
Top Average Total Income Regions by State and Territory, 2008-09


INTRODUCTION


This article presents selected data on estimates of personal income for the years 2003-04 to 2008-09, at a range of geographic levels. These estimates have been compiled using aggregated individual income tax data from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) and are based on the information provided to the ATO by all Australians who lodged a tax return for each financial year. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) wishes to acknowledge the invaluable support of the ATO in compiling these statistics.

There are a number of breaks in series, which are discussed further in the section 'Series Breaks'. Changes in taxation policy can occur in any income year and can, for example, influence whether an individual needs to lodge a tax return, and what is required to be reported on the tax form. Breaks in the ABS series associated with changes of this type can impact on some year-to-year comparisons, however there are still a range of regional analyses able to be undertaken, including:

  • analysing the regional differences in the level and composition of income in any given year;
  • analysing the growth rate of income between years but not including any year affected by series breaks.

In fact, analysing change in sources of personal income over time can provide valuable insight into the nature of regional economies and aspects of the economic well-being of the people who live there.

This article begins with an overview of the sources of personal income for Australia, highlighting variations in average annual growth rates from 2003-04 to 2008-09 by source of income. It then analyses regional variations in average income from all sources at the state/territory and statistical division level for 2008-09.

While personal income data provide insights into the income in regional economies, wealth is also important to economic well-being, since some people on low incomes may have wealth to draw on, such as property and business assets (Australian Social Trends, 2006, cat. no. 4102.0). Conversely, some people on high incomes may also have high levels of debt. This article has a focus on income, but income alone does not necessarily equate with overall economic well-being.

Further analysis of regional incomes, including other sources of income (Wages and salary, Investments and Superannuation and annuities) can be undertaken using the data contained in the spreadsheets attached to this article. For more detailed data on persons earning Wage and salary incomes please refer to Wage and Salary Earner Statistics for Small Areas (cat. no. 5673.0.55.003).

Series Breaks

There are a number of breaks in series which means that some of the data is not able to be compared over time for some selected years. These breaks are outlined below.

Superannuation
One break in series was associated with a change to taxation legislation regarding superannuation which took effect from 1 July 2007. As of this date, people aged 60 years and over who received superannuation income in the form of a lump sum or income stream (such as a pension) from a taxed source, received that income tax free. This means that, if a person has no other income, or their total income is below the tax-free threshold, or any tax payable is mitigated by a tax offset (such as Senior Australian Tax Offset), they are not required to lodge a tax return.

In the ABS series, income from Superannuation and annuities fell from $16.6 billion in 2006-07 to $8.9 billion in 2007-08 and $8.8 billion in 2008-09. This means there is a break in the superannuation series from 2007-08 onwards. Data for 2007-08 and 2008-09 are both on the same basis, but can not be compared with data in the years before these changes (i.e. for 2003-04 to 2006-07).

Tax Bonus
Other breaks in series were associated with the introduction of a one-off tax bonus in 2007-08 as part of the Economic Stimulus Package in response to the Global Financial Crisis. This one-off tax bonus was available to all individuals whose 2007-08 taxable income was $100,000 or less, whose adjusted tax liability was greater than zero and who had filed their 2007-08 tax return by 30 June 2009. The Australian Taxation Office has reported in their Taxation Statistics publications that there was a 7.1% increase in individual tax lodgements for the 2007-08 financial year, in part due to individual lodgements being brought forward to access the tax bonus. This was followed by a fall of 2.8% in individual tax lodgements in 2008-09.

In the ABS series, total income rose by $52.1 billion from 2006-07 to 2007-08, but rose by only $12.3 billion from 2007-08 to 2008-09. The number of individuals in the ABS series fell from 12.4 million in 2007-08 to 12.0 million in 2008-09. This means there is a break in series between 2006-07 and 2007-08 and another break between 2007-08 and 2008-09.

Impacts of Series Breaks on Data Analysis

Analysis of the change in the number of individuals and in total income can be made between any year in the series except for 2007-08. For example, the analysis in this article focuses on the changes from 2003-04 to 2008-09 in total income in Australia.

However, average income in 2007-08 can be used for analysis, although some care should be exercised when doing so. If the changes in income and the number of individuals associated with a particular event are in similar proportions, then the average is not materially affected. Using data for Wage and salary earners for Australia, for example, we can see that from 2003-04 to 2007-08 income from Wages and salaries grew by a larger proportion each year than the number of Wage and salary earners, leading to a rise in average income from Wages and salaries in this period. In 2008-09, Wage and salary income rose by a small proportion, the number of Wage and salary earners fell, therefore resulting in a further increase in average Wage and salary income. Users should exercise some caution in analysing average incomes for regions in 2007-08, however, as changes associated with the tax bonus may not be equally distributed across areas (for example, different effects may be seen in regions with large numbers of low income earners).

The impacts of the breaks in series are illustrated in the following graphs. Graph 1 shows the number of persons by each source of income (please note that individuals may receive income from more than one source).


(a) Breaks in series between 2006-07 and 2007-08 and between 2007-08 and 2008-09
(b) Data prior to 2007-08 are not available

Graph 2 shows Total income by source of income.


(a) Breaks in series between 2006-07 and 2007-08 and between 2007-08 and 2008-09


INCOME CHANGE IN AUSTRALIA, 2003-04 TO 2008-09

Total Income

Total income (excluding Government pensions and allowances) grew by an average of 7.4% per annum from 2003-04 to 2008-09, and while most sources of income grew in absolute terms over this period, the average annual growth rates for each income source varied considerably (Table 1). For example, investment income had the largest average annual growth rate (12.2%), while Own unincorporated business income had the lowest (3.6%).

Table 1. TOTAL INCOME, By Source - Australia

2003-04
2008-09
Average Annual Growth Rate,
2003-04 to 2008-09
Sources
$m
$m
%

Wages & salaries
316 925
453 779
7.4
Own unincorporated business
29 766
35 470
3.6
Investment
34 690
61 575
12.2
Superannuation & annuities (a)
11 002
8 817
n.a.
Other (b)
3 106
5 013
10.0
Total income (b)
395 489
564 654
7.4

(a) Average Annual Growth Rate can not be calculated due to break in series
(b) excludes Government pensions and allowances
n.a. Not Available

Table 2 shows that the three largest sources of income in each year have been Wages and salaries, Investment and income from Own unincorporated business (OUB), with Wages and salaries contributing around 80% of total income.

Table 2. PROPORTION OF TOTAL INCOME, By Source - Australia

Wages & salaries
Own unincorporated business
Investment
Superannuation & annuities (a)
Other
Financial Year
%
%
%
%
%

2003-04
80.1
7.5
8.8
2.8
0.8
2004-05
79.8
7.1
9.2
2.9
0.9
2005-06
79.5
6.8
9.6
3.2
0.9
2006-07
78.4
6.6
10.7
3.3
1.0
2007-08 (a)
80.1
6.7
10.6
1.8
1.0
2008-09
80.3
6.3
10.9
1.6
0.9

(a) Break in series in Superannuation income in 2007-08


Average Income

Average total income data are only available for the 2007-08 and 2008-09 financial years. Over this period, average total income in Australia increased by 5.6%, from $44,402 in 2007-08 to $46,904 in 2008-09.

Graph 3 presents the average income for each personal income source in Australia for the years 2003-04 to 2008-09.


(a) Break in series in Superannuation in 2007-08


This graph shows that:
  • Average Wage and salary income increased from $36,889 in 2003-04 to $46,599 in 2008-09, recording a 6.1% increase between 2007-08 and 2008-09;
  • Average Own unincorporated business (OUB) income increased from $16,538 in 2003-04 to $19,286 in 2008-09, however growth slowed from 2007-08 to 2008-09 (1.7%);
  • Average Investment income rose from 2003-04 to 2006-07, then fell from $8,139 in 2006-07 to $7,781 in 2007-08, before increasing by 4%, to $8,092 in 2008-09;
  • Average Superannuation income rose by 0.1% between 2007-08 and 2008-09.
REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN AVERAGE INCOME, 2008-09

Table 3 presents average income data for 2008-09 for all sources of income, by state and territory. The Australian Capital Territory recorded the highest average total income of all states and territories ($55,714), followed by Western Australia ($51,614) and the Northern Territory ($48,885). In general, capital city statistical divisions recorded substantially higher average total incomes than regions outside of capital cities.

Average Wage and salary incomes were highest in the Australian Capital Territory, Western Australia and New South Wales and, and like average total income there were marked variations between capital cities and regions outside capital cities. Average income from Own unincorporated business was highest in Western Australia ($25,857), Australian Capital Territory ($23,760) and the Northern Territory ($20,048), with capital city statistical divisions recording considerably higher average incomes from this source. Victoria recorded the highest average Investment income in 2008-09, followed by Western Australia and New South Wales. In all cases except Queensland, average income from Investments was higher in capital city regions compared with regions outside of capital cities.

Table 3. AVERAGE INCOME, By Source - Capital Cities and Balance of State, 2008-09

Region
Wages & salaries
Own unincorporated business
Investment
Superannuation & annuities
Other Income (excl. Government pensions & allowances)
Total income from all sources (excl. Government pensions & allowances)
$
$
$
$
$
$

New South Wales
48 793
19 345
8 227
23 139
5 246
48 755
Sydney SD
52 325
24 161
9 217
23 267
6 384
53 429
Balance NSW
41 600
12 984
6 353
22 981
2 851
39 911
Victoria
45 246
18 143
8 979
21 448
3 690
46 013
Melbourne SD
47 351
21 494
9 509
22 060
4 259
48 810
Balance of Vic
38 830
11 971
7 422
19 973
2 010
37 986
Queensland
44 501
16 904
7 155
21 411
3 298
44 239
Brisbane SD
46 814
22 065
7 016
21 875
3 384
47 326
Balance of QLD
42 311
13 854
7 281
21 004
3 222
41 477
South Australia
41 896
19 659
7 651
24 793
3 025
42 675
Adelaide SD
43 056
22 695
7 950
25 444
3 227
44 296
Balance of SA
38 418
15 031
6 815
22 432
2 423
38 119
Western Australia
50 438
25 857
8 876
23 497
5 100
51 614
Perth SD
51 125
27 404
9 291
23 971
5 703
52 784
Balance of WA
48 238
22 650
7 560
21 756
3 016
48 029
Tasmania
39 398
16 905
6 864
21 397
2 911
39 935
Greater Hobart SD
41 435
20 642
7 310
22 775
3 093
42 667
Balance of Tas
37 808
14 650
6 504
19 724
2 742
37 828
Northern Territory
48 049
20 048
3 595
26 864
2 539
48 885
Darwin SD
50 189
23 106
3 839
27 612
2 805
51 206
Balance of NT
43 986
11 988
2 983
24 301
1 822
44 268
Australian Capital Territory
54 747
23 760
5 163
32 251
2 850
55 714
Canberra SD
54 756
23 771
5 165
32 255
2 849
55 725
Australia
46 599
19 286
8 092
23 214
4 153
46 904

(a) excludes Government pensions and allowances


Map 1 illustrates average total income data for 2008-09 by Statistical Local Area (SLA). Over two-thirds of SLAs in Australia recorded average total incomes lower than the national average ($46,904). The highest average total incomes were recorded in the SLAs surrounding Sydney Harbour (Mosman, Woollahra, Hunters Hill), in Mosman Park, Peppermint Grove, Cottesloe and Nedlands in Perth, Ascot and Hamilton in Brisbane, and Stonnington - Prahran and Bayside - Brighton in Melbourne. Outside the capital city statistical divisions, the SLAs with the highest average total incomes were located in the mining regions of Western Australia (Roebourne, Ashburton, East Pilbara, Port Hedland), Queensland (Isaac - Belyando and Broadsound) and South Australia (Roxby Downs).


Map 1. AVERAGE TOTAL INCOME, By Statistical Local Area - Australia, 2008-09



TOP AVERAGE TOTAL INCOME REGIONS BY STATE AND TERRITORY, 2008-09

This section presents data on the five Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) in each capital city statistical division and balance of state with the highest average total incomes in 2008-09. The following tables also include data for 2007-08 (the first year for which data on average total income were available) and the percentage change in average income between 2007-08 and 2008-09.

NEW SOUTH WALES

The SLA of Mosman, on Sydney's North Shore, recorded the highest average total income in Australia in 2008-09 ($130,637), as shown in Table 4. The SLA of Woollahra, in Sydney's east, recorded the State's second highest average total income in 2008-09 ($116,922).

Hunters Hill ($105,730), North Sydney ($87,405) and Ku-ring-gai ($85,727) round out the top five highest income SLAs in New South Wales. Hunters Hill recorded a 11% increase in average total income in 2008-09, largely the result of a 17% rise in average Own unincorporated business income and a 26% increase in average Investment income. In each case, the number of people reporting income from these sources fell slightly in 2008-09, however the absolute value of business and investment income reported rose substantially.

Average incomes in Sydney's Top 5 SLAs are substantially higher than for those for New South Wales across all income sources.

Outside of Sydney, highest average total incomes were recorded in the SLAs of Singleton in the Hunter Valley ($55,577), Queanbeyan ($54,431) and Palerang - Pt A in the state's south-east ($53,170). Average total income in Singleton increased by almost 12% in 2008-09 (average Wage and salary income increased by 11% in this period, while average Investment income rose by 27%).
 
In 2008-09, around 16% of regions (a total of 32 SLAs) in New South Wales recorded average total incomes above the state average ($48,755). Of these, all but 5 were located within the Sydney metropolitan area.

Table 4. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, New South Wales, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Sydney SD
Mosman (A)
131 606
130 637
-0.7
Woollahra (A)
116 376
116 922
0.5
Hunters Hill (A)
95 027
105 730
11.3
North Sydney (A)
83 997
87 405
4.1
Ku-ring-gai (A)
82 195
85 727
4.3
Sydney SD
51 121
53 429
4.5
Balance of NSWSingleton (A)
49,780
55 577
11.6
Queanbeyan (C)
51 227
54 431
6.3
Palerang (A) - Pt A
50 537
53 170
5.2
Newcastle (C) - Inner City
47 375
50 933
7.5
Muswellbrook (A)
46 432
50 880
9.6
Balance of NSW (b)
37 674
39 911
5.9
New South Wales
46 480
48 755
4.9

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'NSW Unknown'

VICTORIA

Areas in Melbourne's inner south-east recorded Victoria's highest average total incomes in 2008-09 (Table 5). The SLA of Stonnington (C) - Prahran recorded the state's highest average total income ($87,432), followed by Bayside (C) - Brighton ($85,519) and Stonnington - Malvern ($81,006). The SLAs of Boroondara - Kew ($79,218) and Port Phillip - West ($78,526) round out the top five.

Outside of Melbourne, highest average total incomes were recorded in the SLAs of Newtown in Geelong ($54,375), Macedon Ranges - Balance, north-west of Melbourne ($50,356), and Latrobe - Traralgon ($46,587).

In 2008-09, around 18% of regions (a total of 36 SLAs) in Victoria recorded average total incomes above the state average ($46,013). Of these, all but 3 were located within the Melbourne metropolitan area.

Table 5. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Victoria, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Melbourne SD
Stonnington (C) - Prahran
82 910
87 432
5.5
Bayside (C) - Brighton
80 948
85 519
5.6
Stonnington (C) - Malvern
77 316
81 006
4.8
Boroondara (C) - Kew
75 385
79 218
5.1
Port Phillip (C) - West
73 187
78 526
7.3
Melbourne SD
46 187
48 810
5.7
Balance of VicNewtown
51 181
54 375
6.2
Macedon Ranges (S) Bal
47 546
50 356
5.9
Latrobe (C) - Traralgon
44 855
46 587
3.9
Geelong
43 672
46 558
6.6
Surf Coast (S) - East
42 287
45 757
8.2
Balance of Vic (b)
36 556
37 986
3.9
Victoria
43 704
46 013
5.3

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'Vic Unknown'

QUEENSLAND

Individuals in the inner-city areas of Ascot and Hamilton earned higher average incomes than Queenslanders in other regions (Table 6). The SLA of Hamilton recorded the highest average total income in Queensland in 2008-09 ($88,272), followed closely by Ascot ($88,259). Average Own incorporated business income increased by over 33% in 2008-09 in each of these SLAs.

Average total incomes in the SLAs of Bardon (a hilly suburb west of the city), Balmoral and Bulimba (riverside suburbs east of the city) increased by over 10% between 2007-08 and 2008-09. Average Investment income rose by over 45% in 2008-09 in both Balmoral and Bulimba.

Outside of Brisbane, highest average total incomes were recorded in the SLAs of Isaac - Belyando ($67,751), Broadsound ($66,505) and Nebo ($66,301), and in the Central Highlands region, Duaringa ($66,071) and Peak Downs ($58,984).

In 2008-09, around 41% of regions (a total of 196 SLAs) in Queensland recorded average total incomes above the state average ($44,239). Of these, around 69% were located within the Brisbane metropolitan area.

Table 6. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Queensland, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Brisbane SD
Hamilton
84 759
88 272
4.1
Ascot
84 766
88 259
4.1
Bardon
64 189
71 001
10.6
Balmoral
64 260
70 777
10.1
Bulimba
64 276
70 770
10.1
Brisbane SD
44 768
47 326
5.7
Balance of QldIsaac (R) - Belyando
62 100
67 751
9.1
Isaac (R) - Broadsound
60 474
66 505
10.0
Isaac (R) - Nebo
58 934
66 301
12.5
Central Highlands (R) - Duaringa
58 579
66 071
12.8
Central Highlands (R) - Peak Downs
58 093
58 984
1.5
Balance of Qld (b)
39 348
41 477
5.4
Queensland
41 911
44 239
5.6

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'QLD Unknown'

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The northern mining centre of Roxby Downs recorded the highest average total income in South Australia ($73,015) in 2008-09, an increase of 10% from 2007-08 (Table 7). Average Wage and salary income rose by 12% in Roxby Downs during this period.

The inner-city SLA of Walkerville recorded the second highest average total income in 2008-09 ($70,552), followed by the SLAs of Burnside - South West ($65,581) and Unley - East ($64,337).

Apart from Roxby Downs, other SLAs outside of Adelaide recording higher average total incomes were Whyalla ($47,278), and the unincorporated areas of Flinders Ranges ($46,287) and Far North ($46,271).

In 2008-09, around 23% of regions (a total of 29 SLAs) in South Australia recorded average total incomes above the state average ($42,675). Of these, around 69% were located within the Adelaide metropolitan area.

Table 7. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, South Australia, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Adelaide SD
Walkerville (M)
67 690
70 552
4.2
Burnside (C) - South-West
61 109
65 581
7.3
Unley (C) - East
60 212
64 337
6.9
Mitcham (C) - North-East
59 120
62 825
6.3
Burnside (C) - North-East
57 639
61 476
6.7
Adelaide SD
41 914
44 296
5.7
Balance of SARoxby Downs (M)
66 400
73 015
10.0
Whyalla (C)
44 699
47 278
5.8
Unincorp. Flinders Ranges
44 741
46 287
3.5
Unincorp. Far North
43 232
46 271
7.0
Barossa (DC) - Tanunda
41 748
45 199
8.3
Balance of SA (b)
36 451
38 119
4.6
South Australia
40 488
42 675
5.4

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'SA Unknown'

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

A substantial increase in investment income from 2007-08 to 2008-09 has taken the SLA of Mosman Park from fourth to the top of Western Australia's highest earning income regions (Table 8). The average total income of Mosman Park increased by 46% in 2008-09 - to $116,197 - the third highest in Australia, behind Mosman and Woollahra in Sydney.

The neighbouring SLAs of Peppermint Grove and Cottesloe were Western Australia's next highest income regions; Peppermint Grove recorded an average total income of $104,148 in 2008-09, followed by Cottesloe ($102,847).

The central metropolitan areas of Nedlands ($91,033) and Claremont ($84,512) recorded increases of 10% and 12% respectively in average total income in 2008-09. The SLA of Nedlands recorded a 11% increase in both average Wage and salary income and average Own unincorporated business income in 2008-09. Claremont recorded a 12% increase in average Wage and salary income and a 24% increase in average Own unincorporated business income in this period.

In 2008-09, around 23% of regions (a total of 36 SLAs) in Western Australia recorded average total incomes above the state average ($51,614). Of these, around half were located outside the Perth metropolitan area, mostly in key mining regions. These include the north-western SLAs of Roebourne ($78,084 - up 11% from 2007-08), Ashburton ($72,889 - up 9%), East Pilbara ($72,255 - up 11%) and Port Hedland ($70,317 - up 10%). The SLA of Mullewa (with 370 income earners) recorded a substantial increase in average total income in 2008-09, largely the result of a large increase in Own unincorporated business income from 2007-08 to 2008-09.

Table 8. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Western Australia, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Perth SD
Mosman Park (T)
79 505
116 197
46.2
Peppermint Grove (S)
100 075
104 148
4.1
Cottesloe (T)
98 219
102 847
4.7
Nedlands (C)
82 840
91 033
9.9
Claremont (T)
75 781
84 512
11.5
Perth SD
48 588
52 784
8.6
Balance of WA (b)Roebourne (S)
70 261
78 084
11.1
Ashburton (S)
66 894
72 889
9.0
East Pilbara (S)
65 354
72 255
10.6
Port Hedland (T)
63 816
70 317
10.2
Mullewa (S)
29 750
68 889
131.6
Balance of WA (b)
44 113
48 029
8.9
Western Australia
47 488
51 614
8.7

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'WA Unknown'

TASMANIA

The SLA of Hobart - Remainder had the highest average income in Tasmania ($51,273 in 2008-09, up 8% from the previous year). Table 9 shows that the SLA of Hobart - Inner recorded the next highest average total income ($48,960).

Of the areas outside the Greater Hobart Statistical Division, the SLAs of West Coast ($47,031) and Launceston - Inner ($42,736) recorded the highest average incomes in 2008-09.

In all, eleven SLAs in Tasmania recorded average total incomes above the state average ($39,935) in 2008-09. Of these, seven were located outside the Greater Hobart Statistical Division.

Table 9. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Tasmania, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Greater Hobart SD
Hobart (C) - Remainder
47 389
51 273
8.2
Hobart (C) - Inner
46 051
48 960
6.3
Kingborough (M) - Pt A
39 786
42 000
5.6
Clarence (C)
39 070
41 510
6.2
Brighton (M)
36 168
38 090
5.3
Greater Hobart SD
40 022
42 667
6.6
Balance of Tas (b)West Coast (M)
43 377
47 031
8.4
Launceston (C) - Inner
40 026
42 736
6.8
Meander Valley (M) - Pt A
39 329
41 897
6.5
Burnie (C) - Pt A
38 369
40 543
5.7
West Tamar (M) - Pt A
38 317
40 140
4.8
Balance of Tas (b)
35 928
37 828
5.3
Tasmania
37 718
39 935
5.9

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'Tasmania Unknown'

NORTHERN TERRITORY

People living in the remote mining areas of Alyangula and Nhulunbuy earned the highest incomes in the Northern Territory in 2008-09 (Table 10). Average total income increased by almost 13% in Alyangula (to $69,213 in 2008-09), and although there was a slight fall in average total income in Nhulunbuy (down 1% from 2007-08), it remains the SLA with the second highest average total income in the Northern Territory.

The central city areas of Parap, Ludmilla, Fannie Bay, Narrows and The Gardens recorded similar average total incomes in 2008-09.

In 2008-09, around 65% of regions (a total of 42 SLAs) in the Northern Territory recorded average total incomes above the territory average ($48,885). Of these, all but 3 were located in the Darwin metropolitan area.

Table 10. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Northern Territory, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Darwin SD
Parap
54 566
57 498
5.4
Ludmilla
54 683
57 439
5.0
Fannie Bay
54 696
57 435
5.0
Narrows
54 764
57 433
4.9
The Gardens
54 809
57 429
4.8
Darwin SD
48 088
51 206
6.5
Balance of NTAlyangula
61 327
69 213
12.9
Nhulunbuy
59 017
58 228
-1.3
West Arnhem (S) - Jabiru
53 293
53 441
0.3
Alice Springs (T) - Stuart
43 620
46 925
7.6
Alice Springs (T) - Charles
43 602
46 911
7.6
Balance of NT (b)
41 393
44 268
6.9
Northern Territory
45 848
48 885
6.6

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners
(b) Excludes SLA 'NT Unknown'

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

People living in the inner southern areas of Forrest and Red Hill recorded the highest average incomes in the Australian Capital Territory in 2008-09 ($85,141 and $85,100 respectively). Griffith ($83,059), Duntroon ($73,936) and Deakin ($73,911) round out the top five (Table 11). Average Own unincorporated business income rose by 11% in Deakin in 2008-09, while average Investment income increased by almost 20% in Forrest, Red Hill and Griffith during the same period.

The Australian Capital Territory recorded the highest average income of all states and territories in 2008-09 ($55,714).

Table 11. TOP AVERAGE INCOMES, Australian Capital Territory, 2007-08 and 2008-09

2007-08
2008-09
Percent change
Top 5 SLAs (a)
$
$
%

Canberra SD
Forrest
78 373
85 141
8.6
Red Hill
78 359
85 100
8.6
Griffith
76 569
83 059
8.5
Duntroon
69 077
73 936
7.0
Deakin
69 060
73 911
7.0
ACT
52 330
55 714
6.5

(a) Excludes SLAs with less than 100 income earners


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