Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Release Date
ABS @ Facebook ABS @ Twitter ABS RSS ABS Email notification service
8624.0 - Retail Industry, Australia: Commodity Sales, 1998-99  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 09/11/2000   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

NOTES


ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION

This publication presents results in respect of 1998-99 from an Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) survey of employing retail businesses. The Retail Industry Survey collected structural data (such as income and expenses) and commodity sales from a sample of retail businesses operating in 1998-99. This survey was previously conducted in 1991-92 when similar data were collected from a larger sample of 29,000 business units. In total, in 1998-99, data relating to 127 retail commodities sold and the corresponding gross margin for the majority of commodities were collected covering each of the 38 retail industry classes. In 1991-92 data were published relating to sales in 41 broader commodity categories for each retail industry class.


COMMENTS ON THIS PUBLICATION

The ABS welcomes comments and suggestions from users recommending industries and data items for inclusion in future surveys. These comments should be addressed to the Director, Service Industries Surveys, Australian Bureau of Statistics, PO Box 10, Belconnen ACT 2616.


RELATED PUBLICATIONS

Other publications which may be of interest are:

  • Business Operations and Industry Performance, Australia (Cat. no. 8140.0)-annual
  • Retail Trade, Australia (Cat. no. 8501.0)-monthly
  • Retail Industry, Australia 1998-99 (Cat. no. 8622.0)
  • Wholesale Industry, Australia 1998-99 (Cat. no. 8638.0)


ABBREVIATIONS

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics
ANZSIC Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification
billion thousand million
RSE Relative standard error
SE Standard error


FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information about these and related statistics, contact the National Information Service on 1300 135 070 or Ross Upson on Canberra 02 6252 5644.


SOURCES OF INCOME


COMPONENTS OF TOTAL INCOME

During 1998-99 the retail trade industry generated $169.3 billion in total income. Of this total 86% ($146.2 billion) were retail sales.

As well, the retail industry generated $12.8 billion in service income (such as income from repairs to goods, takings from meals, commission income and rent, leasing and hiring income) and $8.2 billion in wholesale sales.


RETAIL SALES

The Supermarkets and grocery stores industry groups recorded the highest retail sales by far with $38.3 billion which was 26% of total retail sales. Specialised food retailing ($16.4 billion), Furniture, houseware and appliance retailing ($16.3 billion) and Motor vehicle retailing ($16.2 billion) were the next highest, each contributing approximately 11% to total retail sales.

Household equipment repair services had the lowest retail sales ($0.1 billion) as income in this industry is derived mainly from services or repair activities.


WHOLESALE SALES

Wholesale sales include goods sold by retailers to other businesses, including export sales. Details in this publication relating to wholesale sales have been provided for Motor vehicle parts and accessories, Fleet sales of motor vehicles, Sales of motor vehicles to dealers, Other sales of commercial vehicles, and Other wholesale sales only.

Overall, wholesale sales contributed $8.2 billion (5%) to total sales in the retail trade industry. Motor vehicle retailing, however, had a significant proportion of its income, 25% or $5.7 billion, derived from wholesale sales. The motor vehicle retailing industry has a mixture of sales to the general public as well as sales to fleet operators, government, rental companies or other businesses and other motor vehicle dealers. Two industry classes, Domestic hardware and houseware retailing and Tyre retailing, also received a significant amount of their total income from wholesale sales (14% each). Apart from industry classes Trailer and caravan dealing and Specialised food retailing n.e.c. where 5% of their income is derived from wholesale sales, all the remaining retail industries derived less than 5% of their total income from wholesale sales. In fact, for more than half of the remaining retailers, wholesale sales was less than 1% of total income.

SERVICE INCOME

Total service income ($12.8 billion), made up of Other service income ($11.5 billion), Commission income ($0.9 billion) and Rent, leasing and hiring income ($0.4 billion), contributed 8% to total income. The major contributor to Other service income was Motor vehicle services ($8.4 billion). Within this industry group, the two industry classes predominantly involved in repair activity were Automotive repair and services n.e.c. and Smash repairing which accounted for 84% of Other service income. The Automotive repair and services n.e.c. industry class derived 90% or $4.1 billion of total income from Other service income, whilst Smash repairing derived 98% or $3.0 billion of total income from Other service income. These classes contributed 49% and 35% respectively in Other service income in the Motor vehicle services industry group. Apart from the repair and service industries, only Floor covering retailing recorded a significant proportion (10%) of Other service income.


COMMODITY SALES AND GROSS MARGINS


COMMODITY SALES

The commodity classification used in the Retail industry survey was formed by aggregating the 1,100 or so products in the ABS's Input/Output Product Classification, taking into account how products sold by retail businesses are grouped in business records, and the need to comply with international standards.

For the purposes of this publication, the 127 retail commodities formed by this aggregation process have been grouped under eight generic categories to provide a broad structure for the individual commodity items and to facilitate their location in the tables.

The eight broad groupings are as follows:

Clothing and accessories
    Footwear Fabrics and soft furnishings
    Household goods Personal and other goods
    Food and groceries
    Hardware

    Motor vehicles and associated goods

Sales and gross margin information for individual commodities within these broad categories are shown in Table 2. For a full explanation of the 'includes' and 'excludes' for individual commodity items the reader should consult the detailed descriptions in the Appendix.

Of the $146.2 billion in retail sales recorded in 1998-99, the largest individual commodity was Petrol, diesel and distillate with $10.8 billion, followed by Take away food, ice cream, soft drinks, milk drinks etc. (for immediate consumption) with $7.5 billion and New cars and passenger vans with $7.1 billion.

The commodity grouping with the largest sales was Food and groceries with $51.5 billion or 35% of total retail sales. According to estimated resident population figures for Australia at June 1999, this represented an average of $2,715 per head of population spent on food and groceries over the year. The major item in this commodity grouping was Take away food, ice cream, soft drinks, milk drinks etc. (for immediate consumption) with $7.5 billion, whilst $5.2 billion was spent on Fresh fruit and vegetables, $4.7 billion on Cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products and $3.9 billion on Bread, cakes, pastries and biscuits.

The next largest commodity group was Personal and other goods with sales of $31.6 billion, or 22% of retail sales. Of this amount $7.0 billion was spent on Medical and pharmaceutical products, $4.1 billion on Cosmetics, perfumes and toiletries and $2.1 billion on Newspapers, periodicals and maps.

Motor vehicles and associated goods recorded $30.1 billion (or 21%) of total retail sales. Within this group the largest contributing commodities were Petrol, diesel and distillate ($10.8 billion), New cars and passenger vans ($7.1 billion) and Used cars and passenger vans ($6.9 billion).


HISTORICAL COMPARISON

Due to the differences in the commodity classifications between 1991-92 and 1998-99 only limited comparisons can be made and these are at the broader level aggregates. Of the eight retail commodity groups in 1998-99, all but Hardware are able to be compared with 1991-92. The percentage share of total retail sales of most of the seven comparable groups have remained fairly stable. The largest increases in percentage share of total retail sales occurred in Personal and other goods, up 5% to 22%.


GROSS MARGIN

Gross margin is the difference between the price for which a business purchases goods and the price for which they are sold. Gross margin information presented in Table 2 for each commodity has been expressed as a percentage of sales.

The commodity groupings Clothing and accessories (44%), Footwear (43%) and Fabrics and soft furnishings (41%) recorded the highest gross margins. The highest margin for an indivdual commodity was in the Personal and other goods commodity grouping where the commodities Jewellery and Silverware both recorded a gross margin of 49%. The lowest gross margin by far was recorded in the commodity grouping Motor vehicles and associated goods with only 10%. The lowest single commodity within this grouping was New cars and passenger vans which recorded a gross margin of only 5%.

PERCENTAGE GROSS MARGIN BY COMMODITY GROUPING



EXPLANATORY NOTES


SCOPE AND COVERAGE

1 The scope of the Retail Industry Survey was all public and private employing businesses in Australia, recorded on the ABS Business Register with a predominant activity of retailing (i.e. ANZSIC Division G). The ABS defines a retail business as a business mainly engaged in the resale of new or used goods to final consumers for personal or household consumption or in selected repair activities such as repair of household equipment or motor vehicles. The population for the Retail Industry Survey was taken from the ABS Business Register and was limited to the 116,000 employing retail businesses on the register in June 1999. Non-employing businesses were therefore excluded from this collection.

2 Approximately 7,200 business units were selected from the population using stratified random sampling techniques. All businesses with 50 or more employees and/or multi-state retailing business units were selected in the sample.

3 Data in this publication have been adjusted to allow for lags in processing new businesses to the ABS business register, and the omission of some businesses from the business register. The majority of businesses affected and to which the adjustments apply are small in size. For more information, please refer to ABS Information Paper: Improvements to ABS Economic Statistics, 1997 (Cat. no. 1357.0).


REFERENCE PERIOD

4 The statistical results in this publication are based on the financial year ending 30 June 1999. In a minority of cases, where businesses did not account on a June-year basis, details were reported in respect of the accounting year that ended between 1 October 1998 and 30 September 1999.


STATISTICAL UNIT

5 The unit about which information was collected in the Retail Industry Survey is termed the management unit.The management unit is the highest-level accounting unit within a business, having regard for industry homogeneity, for which accounts are maintained. In nearly all cases it coincides with the legal entity owning the business (i.e. company, partnership, trust, sole operator, etc.). In the case of large diversified businesses, however, there may be more than one management unit, each coinciding with a 'division' or 'line of business'. A division or line of business is recognised where separate and comprehensive accounts are compiled for it.

CLASSIFICATION BY INDUSTRY

6 This publication presents statistics in Tables 1, 3 and 4 classified according to the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industry Classification, 1993 (Cat. no. 1292.0). Each business unit is classified to a single industry. The industry allocated is based on an estimate of the primary activity of the management unit irrespective of whether a range of activities or a single activity is undertaken by the unit. For example a management unit which derives most of its income from retailing activities would have all of its operations included in the aggregates for retailing, even if significant secondary activities (e.g. wholesaling) were undertaken.


CLASSIFICATION BY COMMODITY

7 The product classification used in Tables 2, 3, 4 and 5 was formed by aggregating the 1,100 or so products in the Input/Output Product Classification taking into account how products sold by retail businesses are grouped in records, and the need to comply with international standards.


RELIABILITY OF THE DATA

8 The estimates in this publication are subject to sampling and non-sampling error.


STANDARD ERROR

9 The estimates in this publication are based on information from a sample of businesses in the surveyed population. Consequently, the estimates in this publication are subject to sampling variability; that is, they may differ from the figures that would have been obtained if all units had been included in the survey. One measure of the likely difference is given by the standard error (SE), which indicates the extent to which an estimate might have varied by chance because only a sample of units was included.

10 There are two chances in three that a sample estimate will differ by less than one SE from the figure that would have been obtained if a census had been conducted, and approximately 19 chances in 20 that the difference will be less than 2 SEs.


RELATIVE STANDARD ERROR

11 Sampling variability can be measured by the relative standard error (RSE) which is obtained by expressing the SE as a percentage of the estimate to which it refers. The RSE is a useful measure in that it provides an immediate indication of the percentage errors likely to have occurred due to sampling, and thus avoids the need to refer also to the size of the estimate.

12 As an example of the above, the estimate of Petrol diesel and distillate sales is $10,763 million and the RSE is 7.4%, giving an SE of $796 million. Therefore, there would be 2 chances in 3 that, if all units had been included in the survey, a figure of $9,967 million to $11,559 million would have been obtained, and 19 chances in 20 (i.e. a confidence level of 95%) that the figure would have been in the range $9,229 million to $12,414 million.

13 Information about the relative standard errors relating to key aggregates in this publication can be found in the table at the end of these Explanatory Notes.


NON-SAMPLING ERROR

14 Errors other than those due to sampling may occur because of deficiencies in the register of units from which the sample was selected, non-response, and imperfections in reporting by respondents. Inaccuracies of this kind are referred to as non-sampling errors and they may occur in any collection, whether it be a census or a sample.

15 While it is not possible to quantify non-sampling error, every effort has been made to reduce non-sampling error to a minimum by careful design and testing of questionnaires, efficient operating procedures and systems, and appropriate methodology.


AVAILABILITY OF ADDITIONAL DATA

16 Enquires for further information about these and related statistics in this publication can be made by telephoning the National Information Services 1300 135 070 or Ross Upson on Canberra 02 6252 5644.


COMPARABILITY WITH 1991-92 RETAIL INDUSTRY SURVEY OUTPUT

17 The 1991-92 Retail Industry Survey was collected from 29,000 retail businesses using a broad commodity classification containing 41 categories. The 1998-99 Retail Industry Survey was collected from a smaller sample of 7,200 retail businesses using a finer level commodity classification containing 151 categories. Consequently, a number of cells have a high RSE in 1998-99.

18 It is therefore difficult to draw accurate comparisons as there are a limited number of broad categories which support a one to one match across the two collections.


GENERAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT

19 ABS publications draw extensively on information provided freely by individuals, businesses, governments and other organisations. Their continued cooperation is much appreciated; without it, the wide range of statistics published by the ABS would not be available. Information received by the ABS is treated in strict confidence as required by the Census and Statistics Act 1905.


RELATIVE STANDARD ERRORS FOR SELECTED COMMODITY ITEMS

Income
%

Petrol, diesel and distillate
7.4
Take-away food, ice-cream, soft drinks, milk drinks etc
(for immediate consumption)
6.2
New cars and passenger vans
5.3
Medical and pharmaceutical products
13.1
Used cars and passenger vans
12.0
Fresh fruit and vegetables
3.4
Cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products
5.1
Women's and girl's clothing
7.2
Cosmetics, perfumes and toiletries
4.8
Bread, cakes, pastries and biscuits
2.8
Furniture and mattresses
7.9
Fresh meat
3.7
Domestic appliances(a)
24.0
Other food products
3.5
Men's and boy's clothing
11.4
Canned foods
3.1
Confectionery, chocolate and cocoa products
2.3
Newspapers, periodicals and maps
9.9
Milk and cream
3.8
New and used tyres and tubes for motor vehicles (sold to public)
6.5

(a) See Glossary for definition of Domestic appliances.


APPENDIX DESCRIPTION OF COMMODITY ITEMS


OVERVIEW

This Appendix has been prepared to help users understand the ordering of income items within the tables, and to provide more detailed information on the range of sales items comprising individual commodity items.

The 127 detailed commodity items provided by respondents in respect of retail sales have been grouped under eight generic categories to provide broad structure to the individual commodity items, and to facilitate their location in the tables.

The eight broad groupings are as follows:
    Clothing and accessories
    Footwear Fabrics and soft furnishings
    Household goods
    Personal and other goods
    Food and groceries
    Hardware

    Motor vehicles and associated goods

In addition, data providers were requested to provide estimates of their wholesale sales, commission income, leasing and hiring income, service income and other income. These additional income items are presented at the end of the commodity listing.

Detailed 'includes' and 'excludes' for the income items mentioned above are also presented in the commodity listing and should be consulted by the reader.


DETAILED DESCRIPTIONS OF COMMODITIES AND INCOME ITEMS

To assist in the definition of commodity items a list of the commodities, together with a list of the includes and the excludes, as contained on the actual forms used for the survey, are provided below. Where items do not have includes or excludes the item description itself is considered self explanatory.


Clothing and Accessories

Women's and girls' clothing
    Includes dressing gowns and robes.
    Excludes sleepwear, underwear and hosiery, swimwear, tracksuits and other sportswear.

Men's and boys' clothing
    Includes dressing gowns and robes.
    Excludes sleepwear, underwear and hosiery, swimwear, tracksuits and other sportswear.

Infants' clothing (sizes 0000 to 1)
    Excludes sleepwear, swimwear, underwear and hosiery.

Sleepwear and underwear
    Includes foundation garments.
    Excludes dressing gowns and robes.

Swimwear, tracksuits and other sportswear
    Includes sweat suits and jogging suits.

Other clothing and clothing accessories
    Includes hosiery, leather clothing, scarves, hats, gloves and belts, waterproof clothing, wetsuits and other rubber clothing.
    Excludes footwear, jewellery, handbags.

Footwear
    Running and jogging shoes
      Excludes other sports specific footwear, hiking boots, other footwear.

    Other sports footwear
      Excludes running and jogging shoes, hiking boots, other footwear.

    Hiking boots
      Excludes running and jogging shoes, other sports specific footwear, other footwear.

    Other footwear
      Includes dress shoes, casual shoes, boots, slippers, thongs.
      Excludes running and jogging shoes, other sports specific footwear, hiking boots.


    Fabrics and soft furnishings

    Yarns and fabrics

    Textile products and haberdashery
      Includes manchester, linen and blankets, soft furnishings, textile awnings and blinds, lounge covers, takings from the making and installation of curtains.


    Household goods

    Furniture and mattresses
    Includes outdoor furniture.
      Excludes office furniture, computer furniture.

    Awnings and blinds
      Excludes textile awnings and blinds, takings from installation.

    Floor coverings
      Includes carpet, mats, rugs, vinyl and linoleum, parquetry.
      Excludes ceramic tiles, takings from laying carpet.

    Television sets
      Includes sets which integrate other functions (e.g. VCRs).

    Video cassette recorders and players
      Includes DVD video players.

    Audio equipment
      Includes radios, Hi-fi, cassette players, audio disc players (e.g. DVD, CD).
      Excludes musical instruments and related equipment.

    Domestic appliances-See Glossary
      Includes all parts for these appliances.
      Excludes installation or delivery charges.

    Other household appliances and parts
      Includes irons, vacuum cleaners, electric fans, sewing machines, kitchen appliances (e.g. toasters, kettles, blenders), hair dryers and other personal care goods and all parts for these appliances.

    China, glassware, cutlery and other kitchenware
      Includes cooking implements and utensils, crockery, glasses, coolers for drinks, picnic ware and ornaments.
      Excludes silverware.

    Telephone handsets, answering machines, facsimile machines and modems sold separately
      Includes cordless telephones.
      Excludes mobile phones.

    Personal computers
      Includes PCs and similar desktop units, notebooks, laptops and similar portables.
      Excludes organisers, diaries.

    Computer peripherals, parts and accessories
      Includes scanners, printers, keyboards, CDROM and DVD-ROM drives, RAM, sound cards, video cards.
      Excludes modems sold separately.

    Blank computer storage media
    Includes disks, tapes, etc.
      Excludes RAM.
    Packaged computer software

    On tape, disk, cartridge, CDROM, DVD-ROM.

    Computer game machines
    Includes hand-held units, consoles for use with a television.

    Other electronic equipment
      Includes organisers and diaries.

    Lawn mowers
    Includes push and ride on mowers.

    Other lawn and garden machinery and equipment
    Includes garden tools, lawn trimmers.
    Excludes lawn mowers.


    Personal and other goods

    Blank audio and video media
    Includes tapes, cassettes and recordable CDs.

    Prerecorded audio CD's
    Includes audio CDs, DVDs

    Other prerecorded audio media
      Includes tapes, records, cassettes.
      Excludes CDs.

    Prerecorded video cassettes

    Mobile phones
      Includes mobile personal and car phones, rebates received from telecommunication companies.
      Excludes connection fees, commission for the sales of a 'call plan'.

    Musical instruments
      Includes all electric and acoustic instruments, including electronic keyboards, cases, strings, straps and other accessories, parts for musical instruments.
      Excludes tuition books.

    Cosmetics, perfumes and toiletries
      Includes hair shampoos and conditioners, soap, hand creams or lotions, deodorants, hair brushes, toothbrushes (except electric) and other brushes for personal use.
      Excludes detergents.

    Medical and pharmaceutical products
      Includes non-prescription and prescription pharmaceutical goods for human use, amounts received under pharmaceutical benefits schemes, vitamins and minerals for human use.

    Watches and clocks

    Jewellery

    Silverware
      Excludes cutlery.

    Handbags, suitcases and travel sets
      Includes purses, wallets and billfolds, key cases.
    Books

    Greeting cards

    Stationery
      Includes computer and photocopying paper.

    Newspapers, periodicals and maps

    Other paper products
      Includes toilet paper, tissues, towels, serviettes and similar paper for household and sanitary purposes, paper dishes, cups, plates, cardboard boxes and packaging materials.

    Writing and marking equipment
      Includes pens, pencils and refills, crayons and chalk, inks and ink pads.

    Artworks
      Includes paintings, sculptures, drawings, limited edition prints and original photographs.

    Craftworks
      Includes pottery, ceramics.
    Hobby equipment

    Bicycles

    Ride-on-toys

    Other toys and games
      Includes playing cards, board games, dolls, toy cars.
      Excludes video games.

    Fishing tackle and bait supplies

    Other sporting goods
      Includes cricket bats, squash and tennis racquets, surfboards, snow skis.
      Excludes sportswear, sporting footwear.

    Camping equipment
      Excludes clothing and footwear.

    Cameras and lenses
    Includes video cameras.

    Other photographic equipment and supplies
      Includes projectors, photographic chemicals and films.
      Excludes film processing on own premises.

    Antiques and second-hand goods
      Includes second-hand clothing, unredeemed pledges.
      Excludes motor vehicles, trailers.

    Souvenirs
      Includes goods normally associated with an identifying place or event.

    Pets

    Plants

    Seeds

    Fertilisers
      Excludes agricultural supplies.

    Pesticides, insecticides, fungicides and herbicides
      Excludes agricultural supplies.

    Other garden supplies
      Includes garden ornaments.

    Cut flowers and floral arrangements
      Includes dried flower arrangements, floral tributes, bouquets.
      Excludes pot plants.

    Kerosene


    Food and Groceries

    Take-away food, ice-cream, soft drinks, milk drinks etc (for immediate consumption)
      Includes food sold in take-away packs, bags, or containers.
      Excludes ice-cream sold for consumption at a later date, confectionery.

    Confectionery, chocolate and cocoa products
      Excludes chocolate coated biscuits.

    Bacon, ham and smallgoods
      Excludes all canned products.

    Fresh meat
      Excludes frozen and canned meat, smallgoods, bacon and ham, poultry.

    Fresh poultry
      Excludes frozen poultry.

    Fresh seafood
      Excludes frozen and canned seafood.

    Fresh fruit and vegetables
      Excludes frozen and canned fruit and vegetables.

    Frozen meat
      Excludes frozen poultry.

    Frozen poultry

    Frozen seafood

    Frozen fruit and vegetables

    Frozen cakes, pastries and biscuits
    Includes frozen pizzas.

    Bread, cakes, pastries and biscuits
      Excludes frozen cakes and pastries, bread, cakes and pastries baked on the premises but not sold to the public.

    Ice-cream and frozen confections
      Excludes ice-creams sold for immediate consumption.

    Milk and cream
      Includes yoghurt, flavoured milk.
      Excludes canned milk, dried milk-regular and skim.

    Cheese

    Other dairy products
      Includes dried milk-regular and skim, butter.

    Margarine, oils and fats

    Eggs and egg pulp

    Flour

    Cereal foods and baking mixes

    Canned foods
      Includes meat, vegetable, meat and vegetables, fish, soups, canned and bottled jams, canned and bottled preserved fruit and vegetables, bottled sauces.
      Excludes canned pet foods, soft drinks and juices.

    Sugar

    Coffee

    Tea

    Fruit juice

    Soft drinks, cordials and syrups
      Excludes soft drinks for immediate consumption.

    Other food products
      Excludes dry or canned pet food.

    Cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products
      Excludes cigarette lighters, pipes.

    Cleaning preparations
      Includes detergents, bleaches and disinfectants.
      Excludes soap.

    Prepared animal and bird food
      Includes canned or dried pet food.

    Beer
      Excludes home brew kits and ingredients.

    Wine
      Excludes non-alcoholic wines.

    Spirits and other alcoholic beverages
      Includes packaged spirit mixers.


    Hardware

    Hand tools, powered

    Hand tools, unpowered
      Excludes garden tools.

    Paint
      Excludes automotive paint.

    Plumbing supplies
      Includes pipes and pipe fittings, taps, cocks and valves, baths, toilets, sinks and basins, vanity units.
      Excludes ceramic wall, floor and roofing tiles.

    Metal fasteners
      Includes nuts, bolts, screws, washers and nails.

    Other metal products
      Includes metal ladders, metal fencing, roofing iron.
      Excludes doors and security screens.

    Cement

    Other builders' hardware and supplies

    Electrical hardware
      Includes switches and other electrical fittings, power boards and adaptors, extension cords.


    Motor vehicles and associated goods

    Parts and accessories for motor cycles and motor scooters
      Includes motor cycle tyres, helmets.
      Excludes clothing and boots, batteries, parts used in repairs.

    New and used tyres and tubes for motor vehicles (sold to the public)
      Includes stock retreads and recaps.
      Excludes tyres for motor cycles, tyres for farm machinery, construction, mining, etc.

    New wet cell batteries (sold to the public)
      Includes batteries for motor vehicles, motor cycles and motor scooters sold to the public.

    Oils and lubricants
      Includes solvents, petroleum jelly, waxes, gas oil and fuel oil.
      Excludes motor spirits, kerosene.

    Petrol, diesel and distillate
      Excludes those products sold on commission.

    LPG-automotive and bottled

    New cars and passenger vans
      Note passenger vans have a maximum seating capacity of 9 persons.

    Used cars and passenger vans
      Note passenger vans have a maximum seating capacity of 9 persons.

    New motor cycles and motor scooters
      Includes trail bikes.

    Used motor cycles and motor scooters
      Includes trail bikes.

    New caravans and camping trailers
      Includes car and box trailers.
      Excludes boat trailers, revenue from hiring caravans.

    Used caravans and camping trailers
      Includes car and box trailers.
      Excludes boat trailers, revenue from hiring caravans.

    New boats, outboard motors and boat trailers
    Includes all parts and accessories for boats.
      Excludes car and box trailers, revenue from hiring boats.

    Used boats, outboard motors and boat trailers
    Includes all parts and accessories for boats.
      Excludes car and box trailers, revenue from hiring boats.


    Wholesale sales

    Motor vehicle parts and accessories
      Includes sales of new and used tyres and tubes for motor vehicles to businesses, sales of new and used tyres and tubes for other vehicles and equipment, sales of new wet cell batteries to businesses, car radios, cassettes and CD players, other new parts and accessories and used parts and accessories.

    Fleet sales of motor vehicles
      Includes sales of new and used cars and passenger vans to fleet operators, government, rental companies or other businesses and sales of new and used commercial vehicles to fleet operators, government, rental companies or other businesses.

    Sales of motor vehicles to other dealers
      Includes sales of new and used cars and passenger vans to motor vehicle dealers and sales of new and used commercial vehicles to motor vehicle dealers.

    Other sales of commercial vehicles
      Includes sales of new and used commercial vehicles to the public.

    Other wholesale sales
      Includes doors and security screens, other wooden builders' joinery and carpentry, plywood and veneers, hardboard and particle board, other timber, sand, gravel and other construction materials, clay products, concrete products, plaster products and lighting.

    Commission income
      Includes income received from sales of goods not owned by the business.


    Rent, leasing and hiring income

    Rent, leasing and hiring income
      Includes income received from renting, leasing or hiring of vehicles, land, buildings, plant, machinery, equipment and any other property to other businesses or individuals.


    Total other service income

    Meals sold for consumption on premises
      Includes meals consumed on the premises with cutlery.
      Excludes meals consumed on the premises served without cutlery and/or in take away packaging.

    Smash repairs

    Other motor vehicle repairs and services

    Other service income
      Includes consultancy fees, contract mining services, installation fees, management and administration service fees, subscriptions and membership fees and other specified and unspecified service fees.


    GLOSSARY

    Commission income

    Includes income received from sales of goods not owned by the business.

    Domestic appliances

    Includes domestic stoves, refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, wall and microwave ovens, dryers, dishwashers, airconditioners, evaporative coolers and space heaters.

    Gross Margin

    The difference between the price for which a business purchases goods and the price for which they are sold.

    Other income

    Includes interest, government funding, royalties and dividends, net profit (loss) on the sale of non-current assets, foreign loans as a result of variations in foreign exchange rates/transaction and on share trading. Excluded are extraordinary profits or losses such as goodwill revaluations.

    Other service income

    Includes consultancy fees, installation fees, management and administration service fees, subscriptions and membership fees and other specified and unspecified service fees.

    Retail sales

    Includes sales of goods to the public, delivery charges not seperately invoiced and export sales to final consumers.

    Rent, leasing and hiring income

    Includes income received from renting, leasing or hiring of vehicles, land, buildings, plant, machinery, equipment and any other property to other businesses or individuals.

    RSE Relative standard error.

    See paragraph 11-13 of the Explanatory Notes.

    Sales

    As shown in the heading in table 2 refers to an income item which is in the main retail sales. All items appearing below the total retail sales figure in the table are other sources of income.

    Total income

    The sum of all income items. The major items included are retail sales, wholesale sales, service and other income. Income from all other sources such as renting, leasing, hiring, interest earned, government funding, royalty and dividend are also included.

    Wholesale sales

    Includes goods sold to other businesses, delivery charges not seperately invoiced to other businesses and export sales to other businesses.


    Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

    Commonwealth of Australia 2014

    Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.