Australian Bureau of Statistics

Rate the ABS website
ABS Home > Statistics > By Catalogue Number
3311.2 - Demography, Victoria, 2001  
Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 19/12/2002   
   Page tools: Print Print Page Print all pages in this productPrint All RSS Feed RSS Bookmark and Share Search this Product

DEMOGRAPHIC SUMMARY


POPULATION

The estimated resident population of Victoria at the end of December 2001 was 4,854,100 persons, representing one-quarter of the total Australian population.

In 2001, Victoria experienced population growth of 1.3% which was the same as that for Australia. The highest population growth in 2001 occurred in Queensland (1.9%) while Tasmania had the lowest population growth (0.2%).

In 2001, the Melbourne Statistical Division (SD) population grew by 1.5% while the Balance of Victoria grew by 1.0%. Within the Melbourne SD the fastest growing Local Government Areas were the Shire of Melton (8.5%), the City of Melbourne (5.5%) and the City of Casey (4.5%).


BIRTHS AND CONFINEMENTS

In 2001, there were 58,600 births registered where the mother's place of usual residence was Victoria. This is a 1% decrease on the number registered in 2000 and a 10% decrease on the number registered in 1991.

The average total fertility rate for Victoria was 1.62 over the three years 1999 to 2001. This represents the average number of children each woman would bear if the current birth rates continued during her childbearing lifetime. The highest total fertility rate for a Statistical Division (SD) was 2.11 in Mallee (SD), while the lowest fertility rate was 1.55 in Melbourne (SD).

In 2001, the local government area in Melbourne (SD) recording the highest number of births was the City of Casey with 2,800 births. This was followed by the City of Brimbank with 2,300 births. In the remainder of Victoria, the highest numbers were recorded in the local government areas of the City of Greater Geelong with 2,200 births and the City of Greater Bendigo with 1,000 births.


DEATHS

In 2001, there were 32,300 deaths registered where the deceased's place of usual residence was Victoria. This is a 1% increase on the number registered in 2000 and a 3% increase on the number registered in 1991.

The indirect standardised death rate for Victoria was 5.5 (deaths per 1,000 population) in the period from 1999 to 2001. This represents the death rate that would have prevailed in a standard population (here, the 1991 Australian population) if it had experienced the death rates at each age of the population being analysed (e.g. Victoria 2001).

The highest indirect standardised death rate for a Statistical Division (SD) was 6.3 in East Gippsland (SD), while the lowest rate was 5.4 in Melbourne (SD).

In 2001, the local government area in Melbourne (SD) recording the highest number of deaths was the City of Boroondara with 1,300 deaths. This was followed by the Shire of Mornington Peninsula with 1,200 deaths. In the remainder of Victoria, the highest numbers were recorded in the local government areas of the City of Greater Geelong with 1,600 deaths and the City of Greater Bendigo with 700 deaths.


MIGRATION

In 2001, net overseas migration contributed 27,500 persons to Victoria's population growth. In 2000, the gain from overseas migration was 26,900 persons. Since 1981 Victoria's level of net overseas migration has fluctuated substantially. The high point occurred in 1989 when the figure was 34,100 persons and the low point occurred in 1993 when the figure was 8,000 persons.

In 2001, and for the fourth year in succession, Victoria had positive net interstate migration with a gain of 7,700 persons. The average gain from net interstate migration in the period 1998-2001 was 5,700 persons per year. This compares to an average loss from net interstate migration of 17,400 persons per year in the period 1991-1997.


MARRIAGES

There were 25,000 marriages registered in Victoria in 2001. These represent a crude marriage rate of 5.2 marriages per 1,000 population, slightly lower than the national rate of 5.3 marriages per 1,000 population.

The median ages (see Glossary) at marriage for brides and bridegrooms in Victoria, in 2001, were 28.7 years and 30.5 years respectively. The corresponding figures for Australia were 28.6 years for brides and 30.6 years for bridegrooms.


DIVORCES

There were 13,700 divorces granted in Victoria in 2001. These represent a crude divorce rate of 2.8 divorces per 1,000 population, the same as the national rate. Median duration of marriage of 11.9 years was higher than the national figure as well as being higher than that for New South Wales, Queensland and the Northern Territory.


Bookmark and Share. Opens in a new window

Commonwealth of Australia 2014

Unless otherwise noted, content on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia Licence together with any terms, conditions and exclusions as set out in the website Copyright notice. For permission to do anything beyond the scope of this licence and copyright terms contact us.