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3101.0 - Australian Demographic Statistics, Mar 2012 Quality Declaration 
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 27/09/2012   
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ANNUAL POPULATION CHANGE - YEAR ENDING 31 MARCH 2012


AUSTRALIA: POPULATION AND GROWTH

The preliminary estimated resident population (ERP) of Australia at 31 March 2012 was 22,596,500 people. This reflects an increase of 331,200 people since 31 March 2011 and 111,100 people since 31 December 2011.

The annual population growth rate for the year ended 31 March 2012 was 1.5%. This continues an increasing rate from a low of 1.1% for the year ending March 2011.

ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH RATE(a), Australia
Graph: ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH RATE(a), Australia



COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE

The growth of Australia's population has two components: natural increase (the number of births minus the number of deaths) and net overseas migration (NOM).

The contribution to population growth for the year ended 31 March 2012 was higher for net overseas migration (57%) than for natural increase (43%). The contribution of NOM to population growth for the year ending March 2012 increased from 53% whilst the contribution of natural increase to population growth decreased from 47% over the same period.

COMPONENTS OF ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH(a), Australia
Graph: COMPONENTS OF ANNUAL POPULATION GROWTH(a), Australia



Natural Increase

Natural increase for the year ended 31 March 2012 was 149,600 people, an increase of 3.0%, or 4,400 people, when compared with natural increase for the year ended 31 March 2011 (145,200 people).

Births

The preliminary estimate of births for the year ended 31 March 2012 (295,400 births) was 1.2%, or 3,600 births, higher than the figure for the year ended 31 March 2011 (291,800 births).

Deaths

The preliminary estimate of deaths for the year ended 31 March 2012 (145,800 deaths) was 0.5%, or 800 deaths, lower than the figure for the year ended 31 March 2011 (146,600 deaths).


Net Overseas Migration

For the year ended 31 March 2012, Australia's preliminary net overseas migration estimate was 197,200 people. This was 18.2% (30,400 people) higher than the net overseas migration estimated for the year ended 31 March 2011 (166,800 people).

NOM arrivals increased by 9.5% (39,700 people) between the years ended 31 March 2011 (420,000 people) and 31 March 2012 (459,800 people).

NOM departures increased by 3.7% (9,400 people) between the years ended 31 March 2011 (253,200 people) and 31 March 2012 (262,600 people).

The preliminary net overseas migration estimate for the March quarter 2012 (71,000 people) was 22.8% (13,200 people) higher than the estimate for the March quarter 2011 (57,800 people).


STATES AND TERRITORIES: POPULATION AND GROWTH

The estimated resident population for each state and territory at 31 March 2012 was as follows:
  • New South Wales 7,272,800;
  • Victoria 5,603,100;
  • Queensland 4,537,700;
  • South Australia 1,650,600;
  • Western Australia 2,410,600;
  • Tasmania 512,100;
  • Northern Territory 233,300; and
  • Australian Capital Territory 373,100.

All states and territories recorded positive population growth in the year ended 31 March 2012. Western Australia continued to record the fastest growth rate of all states and territories with 3.1%. Tasmania recorded the slowest growth rate at 0.3%.


COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE

At the state and territory level, population growth has three components: natural increase, net overseas migration and net interstate migration.

Although all states and territories experienced positive population growth in the year ended 31 March 2011, the proportion that each of these components contributed to population growth varied between the states and territories.

For the year ended 31 March 2012, natural increase was the major component of population change in Tasmania, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory. Net overseas migration was the major component of population change in South Australia, followed by New South Wales, Western Australia, Victoria and Queensland. Net interstate migration losses were recorded in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory.


Natural Increase

Estimates of births and deaths are subject to fluctuations caused by lags or accumulations in the reporting of birth and death registrations (for more information see paragraphs 10-11 of the Explanatory Notes).

Births

The total number of births registered for the year ended 31 March 2012 increased in all states and territories, except for New South Wales and Queensland, when compared with the previous year. New South Wales recorded a decrease of 0.6% (600 births) since the year ended 31 March 2011, and Queensland a decrease of 1.0% (600 births) during the same period. The largest percentage increase of registered births was recorded in the Northern Territory at 8.7% (320 births). For more information, see table 13.

Deaths

The total number of deaths registered for the year ended 31 March 2012 decreased for all states and territories, except for New South Wales (1.3%), Western Australia (0.8%) and Queensland (0.8%), when compared with the previous year. The largest decrease was in Victoria where there was a drop of 1,200 deaths between the year ended 31 March 2012 and the previous year (3.2% drop). For more information, see table 14.


Net Overseas Migration

All states and territories recorded both positive and increased net overseas migration (NOM) when compared to the previous year. Western Australia recorded the largest numerical increase at 14,400 people (49.3%) whilst Tasmania recorded the lowest at 100 (7.9%). New South Wales recorded the smallest percentage increase at 4.8% (2,400 people) and the Northern Territory recorded the largest percentage increase at 130.9% (900 people). For more information, see table 16.

NOM arrivals

When compared to the year ended 31 March 2011, all states and territories recorded increases in NOM arrivals. The largest percentage increase was recorded by Western Australia at 28.0% (16,200 people). Tasmania recorded the smallest percentage increase of 2.0% (60 people). For more information, see table 16.

NOM departures

When compared to the year ended 31 March 2011, increases in NOM departures were recorded for all states and territories except for Tasmania (1% decrease). Both Victoria and Western Australia recorded a 6.0% increase in departures (3,500 people and 1,700 people respectively). For more information, see table 16.


Net Interstate Migration

Queensland recorded the highest gains from net interstate migration (NIM) for the year ended 31 March 2012 (11,200 people). Other states and territories which recorded net gains were Western Australia (9,900 people), Victoria (2,400 people) and the Australian Capital Territory (600 people). Net losses from interstate migration were recorded in New South Wales (17,800 people), South Australia (2,700 people), Tasmania (2,100 people) and the Northern Territory (1,700 people). For more information, see table 19.

Interstate Migration, Arrivals, Departures and Net - Year ended 31 March 2012
Graph: Interstate Migration, Arrivals, Departures and Net—Year ended 31 March 2012



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