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1301.0 - Year Book Australia, 2009–10  
Previous ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 04/06/2010   
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Contents >> Energy >> Energy use

ENERGY USE

Total energy use

In 2007-08 Australia's total domestic energy use was 5,773 PJ, less than one-third of the total energy it produced (17,452 PJ) (diagram 19.4). Over the period 1977-78 to 2007-08 there was a 93% increase in Australia's total energy use (graph 19.11).

19.11 TOTAL ENERGY USE
Graph: 19.11 TOTAL ENERGY USE



Energy conversion and supply losses

The energy conversion sectors accounted for approximately three-quarters (4,494 PJ) of total domestic energy use in 2007-08 (diagram 19.4). The energy conversion sectors (including electricity generators, petroleum refiners, operators of coke ovens and blast furnaces, and gas manufacturers) transform primary energy products into more useful, higher value-added derived energy products. For example, petroleum refiners transform crude oil into petroleum products such as petrol and diesel.

The electricity generation and petroleum refining sectors are the two main users of energy. In 2007-08 these two conversion sectors used 2,514 PJ and 1,490 PJ respectively (table 19.12). Since 2002-03, energy use by the electricity generation sector has increased by 13% and energy use by the petroleum refining sector has declined by 11%.

19.12 ENERGY USED IN CONVERSION, By sector

2002-03
2007-08
Change from 2002-03 to 2007-08
PJ
PJ
%

Coke oven operation
127.2
137.4
8.0
Briquetting
13.9
6.3
-54.7
Petroleum refining
1 677.5
1 489.5
-11.2
Electricity generation
2 235.2
2 514.2
12.5
Gas manufacturing
2.0
0.6
-70.0
Other conversion(a)
72.3
82.6
14.2
Fuel used in conversion
263.2
263.4
0.1
Total
4 391.3
4 494.0
2.3

(a) Includes return streams to refineries from the petrochemical industry; consumption of coke in blast furnaces; blast furnace gas manufacture; electricity produced through cogeneration; and brown coal tar produced in tar manufacture.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics - Australian Energy Update', 2004 and 2009, Table A.



Derived energy products

In 2007-08 Australia produced 2,638 PJ of derived energy products (diagram 19.4). These products included thermal electricity (868 PJ), automotive gasoline (584 PJ), diesel (470 PJ), aviation turbine fuel (191 PJ) and coal products (180 PJ) (table 19.13).

The production of derived energy remained essentially the same in 2007-08 as it was in 2002-03 (2,638 PJ in 2007-08 compared with 2,643 PJ in 2002-03). While the production of thermal electricity increased from 778 PJ to 868 PJ (up 12%) in this period, there was a fall in the production of most petroleum products - automotive gasoline (down 5%), fuel oil (down 32%), diesel (down 9%) and briquettes (down 44%). Aviation turbine fuel increased slightly (up 1%) along with the other coal products - coke up 1% and coal by-products up 1%.

Significant energy losses are involved in the process of transforming primary energy resources into derived energy products and in the delivery of derived energy products to the market. In 2007-08, almost one-third (1,856 PJ) of the total energy available for domestic use was lost through the conversion processes and through distribution and transmission systems (diagram 19.4).

19.13 PRODUCTION OF DERIVED ENERGY

2002-03
2007-08
Change from 2002-03 to 2007-08
PJ
PJ
%

Coal products
Coke
96.9
98.2
1.3
Coal by-products
78.6
79.2
0.8
Briquettes
5.4
3.0
-44.4
Petroleum products
Automotive gasoline
613.1
584.1
-4.7
Aviation turbine fuel
188.6
190.7
1.1
Fuel oil
57.7
39.2
-32.1
Diesel(a)
515.2
470.2
-8.7
Thermal electricity
778.3
868.0
11.5
Other
309.5
305.6
-1.3
Total
2 643.3
2 638.2
-0.2

(a) Includes automotive diesel oil and industrial and marine diesel fuel.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics - Australian Energy Update', 2009, Table A, C & F.



Energy end-use by sector

In 2007-08 Australia's end-users of energy, comprising households and industries (excluding the conversion sectors), used 3,917 PJ of energy, an increase of 13% since 2002-03 (table 19.14).

The transport sector was the largest end-user of energy, using 1,362 PJ in 2007-08. In 2007-08 road transport accounted for 75% (1,028 PJ) of the transport sector's energy use, with the remaining contributors being air transport (226 PJ), water transport (71 PJ) and rail transport (38 PJ). The manufacturing sector was the second highest user of energy (1,219 PJ) in 2007-08. Together with the transport sector, these two sectors account for 66% of total energy end-use.

19.14 ENERGY END-USE, By sector

2002-03
2007-08
Change from 200203 to 200708
PJ
PJ
%

Agriculture
105.7
92.6
-12.4
Mining
295.4
449.7
52.2
Manufacturing
Iron and steel
134.3
117.4
-12.6
Chemical
184.9
202.3
9.4
Other industry
802.9
899.1
12.0
Total
1 122.1
1 218.8
8.6
Construction
27.7
26.4
-4.7
Transport(a)
Road transport
964.6
1 027.5
6.5
Rail transport
29.7
37.5
26.3
Air transport
159.6
226.3
41.8
Water transport
52.2
70.6
35.2
Total
1 206.1
1 361.9
12.9
Commercial(b)
235.5
278.9
18.4
Residential(c)
412.5
425.7
3.2
Other(d)
60.1
62.9
4.7
Total
3 467.3
3 916.9
13.0

(a) Includes all transport use, including household motor vehicle use.
(b) Includes wholesale and retail trade, communications, finance and insurance, property and business services, government administration and defence, education, health and community services, cultural and recreational services, and person
(c) Transport use by households is included in transport.
(d) Includes lubricants and greases, bitumen and solvents, as well as energy consumption in the gas production and distribution industries.
Source: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 'Australian Energy Statistics Australian Energy Update' 2009, Table A.



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